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#ActualGeometrian

Posted 23 January 2013 - 11:21 PM

Unfortunately, I do not have ideal resources to point you to. Like almost anything worth doing in Computer Science, most of it has to be figured out through experimentation. Even if you learn something from a book or tutorial, you don't learn it in the way you need to if you want to be successful.

 

That said, having code to reverse engineer is imperative. As an experienced PyGame programmer myself, I humbly present my PyGame Base Code, which is a tiny, tried and true tested starting point that I myself use frequently. It won't get you audio/fonts/animation, but it will get you started if you aren't already.

 

Secondly, I suggest you look at the examples directory that comes with PyGame. The "chimp" example is probably best for your purposes. The "aliens" example is also pretty simple, and while I personally think it takes object orientation too far and makes gratuitously unnecessary use of sprites, it is a solid example that demonstrates both basic audio and font rendering.

 

Lastly, PyGame is a really easy library to use. It is small, fast, and pretty robust. You should try playing around with it. I myself learned with no tutorials whatsoever, simply trying different API calls until I got what I wanted. I recommend you do the same, at least some. The graphics, in particular, are quite intuitive.


#1Geometrian

Posted 23 January 2013 - 11:19 PM

Unfortunately, I do not have ideal resources to point you to. Like almost anything worth doing in Computer Science, most of it has to be figured out through experimentation. Even if you learn something from a book or tutorial, you don't learn it in the way you need to if you want to be successful.

 

That said, having code to reverse engineer is imperative. As an experienced PyGame programmer myself, I humbly present my PyGame Base Code, which is a tiny, tried and true tested starting point that I myself use frequently. It won't get you audio/fonts/animation, but it will get you started if you aren't already.

 

Secondly, I suggest you look at the examples directory that comes with PyGame. The "aliens" example is pretty simple, and while I personally think it takes object orientation too far, and makes gratuitously unnecessary use of sprites, it is a solid example that demonstrates both basic audio and font rendering.

 

Lastly, PyGame is a really easy library to use. It is small, fast, and pretty robust. You should try playing around with it. I myself learned with no tutorials whatsoever, simply trying different API calls until I got what I wanted. I recommend you do the same, at least some. The graphics, in particular, are quite intuitive.


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