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#ActualNightCreature83

Posted 25 January 2013 - 03:58 AM

Actually XNA 4.0 changed all of that and it's model is far closer to DX11 then it is to DX9 even though in the back end you are still running a DX9 application. The renderstates are now non-mutable instances, setting of vertex buffers on the device has changed to look more like the DX11 way. The draw calls on the device are modelled after the DX11 draw calls, setting up of index and vertex buffers is also similar to DX11 although not modeled on generic buffers sadly.

If you learn XNA4.0 switching to DX11 afterwards is easier although not the same you are going to have to learn how things are different mostly to do with the context and device split in DX11 which XNA doesn't do.

Using C++ and DX11 isn't harder then using C# and XNA once you know the technologies involved, it is less productive to use DX11 and C++ as you will have to write a lot more boilerplate code than you have to in XNA. If you need to learn C++ as well I'd say stick to C# and use slimDX(or similar wrapper) instead which allows you to use DX11 in C#.

#1NightCreature83

Posted 25 January 2013 - 03:19 AM

Actually XNA 4.0 changed all of that and it's model is far closer to DX11 then it is to DX9 even though in the back end you are still running a DX9 application. The renderstates are now non-mutable instances, setting of vertex buffers on the device has changed to look more like the DX11 way. The draw calls on the device are modelled after the DX11 draw calls, setting up of index and vertex buffers is also similar to DX11 although not modeled on generic buffers sadly.

 

If you learn XNA4.0 switching to DX11 afterwards is easier although not the same you are going to have to learn how things are different mostly to do with the context and device split in DX11 which XNA doesn't do.


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