Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

#Actualnsmadsen

Posted 25 January 2013 - 08:49 AM

The best advice I can offer is to try out a few DAWs (almost all of them offer some kind of demo/trial period at no cost). See which one(s) seem to click more than others. As stated above there's a learning curve with any of them but it's like different brands of cars. All of them basically do the same thing although the names and steps may differ (sometimes only slightly). My point is learn one and you can more easily pick up others.

 

In my own experience, I started on Cakewalk's Sonar and played around with it exclusively for five years. Then I added in Reason and those were my only two DAWs for the next five years in my home studio. Due to a work studio setup, I had to learn Pro Tools and Logic (as well as Mac). Now my home studio runs Logic, Reason and Pro Tools (although I rarely use it now). And while the stance that all DAWs are pretty much equal do note that some platforms such as Reaper, come with very little bundled instruments so you'd need to have a decent 3rd party collection to produce music.

 

Edit: Also beware that some don't work with video post production. Reason's a good example and it also doesn't support 3rd party libraries like Native Instruments or East West. Instead they have their own format called Refills which they support. So take a look at what kinds of things you might want to do and see which DAWs support that.


#1nsmadsen

Posted 25 January 2013 - 08:48 AM

The best advice I can offer is to try out a few DAWs (almost all of them offer some kind of demo/trial period at no cost). See which one(s) seem to click more than others. As stated above there's a learning curve with any of them but it's like different brands of cars. All of them basically do the same thing although the names and steps may differ (sometimes only slightly). My point is learn one and you can more easily pick up others.

 

In my own experience, I started on Cakewalk's Sonar and played around with it exclusively for five years. Then I added in Reason and those were my only two DAWs for the next five years in my home studio. Due to a work studio setup, I had to learn Pro Tools and Logic (as well as Mac). Now my home studio runs Logic, Reason and Pro Tools (although I rarely use it now). And while the stance that all DAWs are pretty much equal do note that some platforms such as Reaper, come with very little bundled instruments so you'd need to have a decent 3rd party collection to produce music.


PARTNERS