Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

#ActualHodgman

Posted 25 January 2013 - 11:35 PM

Firstly, the 'graphic design' term isn't used that much in games job titles -- the majority of the art for 3D games is 3D modelling and texturing, which is a bit different. Traditional 'graphic design' skills would be more use on the UI team rather than the general art team. Also, many art positions are somewhat multi-skilled, where someone who can do 3D sculpting, 3D modelling/topography, texuring, digital painting and traditional graphic design would be very valuable.
e.g. if you have to model a van, paint the textures on it, and also design a logo that appears on the side, that's a bunch of different art disciplines. At some companies, they might use a group of different specialists to complete the task, or at other jobs they might use one generalist.

1) When it comes to digital painting, which includes most texture work and concept art, then photoshop is the standard. If you're developing icons for a UI, then a vector art package might be more suitable.

2) There's usually a standard set of software per company, which they've licensed for their staff. Depending on the company, you may be able to supplement that with your own choices. Some might not care if you use Gimp, but others might have their whole game engine built around .PSD files, or scripts within Photoshop, or you might have to collaborate and share files, in which case your chosen non-standard tool would be a hassle.

3) At decent sized companies, most jobs are regular full-time positions. It's the same for all disciplines, including code, etc, not just art.
The games industry is very volatile though, with seemingly dozens of studio closures every year, so continual relocation seems to be a fact of life for many people.

#1Hodgman

Posted 25 January 2013 - 11:26 PM

Firstly, the 'graphic design' term isn't used that much in games -- the majority of the art for 3D games is 3D modelling and texturing, which is a bit different. Traditional 'graphic design' skills would be more use on the UI team rather than the general art team. Also, many art positions are somewhat multi-skilled, where someone who can do 3D sculpting, 3D modelling/topography, texuring, digital painting and traditional graphic design would be very valuable.

1) When it comes to digital painting, which includes most texture work and concept art, then photoshop is the standard. If you're developing icons for a UI, then a vector art package might be more suitable.

2) There's usually a standard set of software per company, which they've licensed for their staff. Depending on the company, you may be able to supplement that with your own choices. Some might not care if you use Gimp, but others might have their whole game engine built around .PSD files, or scripts within Photoshop, or you might have to collaborate and share files, in which case your chosen non-standard tool would be a hassle.

3) At decent sized companies, most jobs are regular full-time positions. It's the same for all disciplines, including code, etc, not just art.
The games industry is very volatile though, with seemingly dozens of studio closures every year, so continual relocation seems to be a fact of life for many people.

PARTNERS