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#ActualDan Mayor

Posted 31 January 2013 - 12:11 PM

Most (if not all) complex engines use a scripting language to handle all of their logic, interface and so on.  C++ Is the language of the engine (and incorrectly some people use it to code everything).  C#, Javascript and Boo are the language of Unity, Lua is the language of many others, Python is probably the next most common from what I've seen.  Point is as a C++ programmer you'r usefulness is not in making the game so much as it is in making the engine and tool kits.  Considering most small / indie teams that actually produce a project by using a premade engine (most commonly now a days is unity) it's highly unlikely you will be recruited or hired to do C++ for gaming teams.

 

Now I'm sure people will come back to this saying "Our game uses nothing but C++, but we already have a programmer".  9 times out of 10 these are also the teams that have been working on their game for over a year and if they are lucky all they have to show is thousands of lines of code that power their engine, they won't have anything to show as far as the game goes.  So of course you should do some research to find where the demand is, from my experience (been doing this for over 15 years now) it's rarely to never in C++.  Simply put the big boys are the only ones that finish games AND need a C++ programmer.  The C++ programmer that they need must have been a member of previous game projects before they will even be considered.  You will end up behind a seemingly insurmountable brick wall when you stick to just C++ (although you will find yourself working your butt off time and time again for teams to fall apart due to long spans of working for little or no results).

 

My recommendation is always to learn basic C++ up to the point where you fully understand variables (and data types), functions, classes, methods and members.  Once you fully understand these core concepts move in to C# (because this will allow you to work in Unity and actually get jobs, create your own games and what not).  Once you get to the point where you feel comfortable scripting in C# look in to Javascript (which will let you make interactive website widgets and HTML5 games).  Yet another of the truly high demand fields that also empower you to get results fairly easily.

 

All in all if your goal is to make games you want to think like a designer first and a coder second.  What can you get / learn that will let you slap your game together and add logic?  The answer is not C++ no matter how popular that belief is, the answer is a premade game engine such as Unity, UDK, Torque and I'm sure many others.  When you start looking at these premade engines you find out it's free to use them as is meaning you "script" your logic in some other language like C#, Javascript, Boo, UnrealScript and so on.  When you want to use C++ with any of them you start looking at license fee's anywhere from $1,500.00 - $450,000.00 USD.

 

I'm not belittling C++ it is a very powerful cross platform language that is among the highest performance languages in existence.  I'm simply trying to point out that it is rarely ever actually used in the game itself.  It's used to make the underlying engine systems, and 9 times out of 10 even the big AAA companies don't even use 75% of hardware performance issues.  As such most successful indie and small development studios get to where they are by realizing they don't need to build an in house engine, they need to complete their game and the way to do that is speed up hundreds if not thousands of times using technology that has already been made available to you.  (Eg get an engine, script in the language it wants and you actually finish your game).

 

Long story short, yes learn C++ but learn the language and the art of programming don't focus so much on using it to access direct x and open gl yet, just learn to program.  Once you learn to program start expanding your knowledge and look in to using engines to make games.  If you think the performance is too slow go take a cold shower lol. As rude as it sounds if you need more power than something like Unity or UDK provide you are doing something wrong.  Unity is just as powerful (if not more so) than you are likely to write yourself (your haven't been doing it for a dozen or so years like they have.  They have both perfected the art way better than you are likely too within the next few years and they focus on bettering their engine so you can make a game).  UDK is one of the maybe 2 most powerful engines in the world, if it can't handle what your doing nothing is likely to do it.


#3Dan Mayor

Posted 31 January 2013 - 12:07 PM

Most (if not all) complex engines use a scripting language to handle all of their logic, interface and so on.  C++ Is the language of the engine (and incorrectly some people use it to code everything).  C#, Javascript and Boo are the language of Unity, Lua is the language of many others, Python is probably the next most common from what I've seen.  Point is as a C++ programmer you'r usefulness is not in making the game so much as it is in making the engine and tool kits.  Considering most small / indie teams that actually produce a project by using a premade engine (most commonly now a days is unity) it's highly unlikely you will be recruited or hired to do C++ for gaming teams.

 

Now I'm sure people will come back to this saying "Our game uses nothing but C++, but we already have a programmer".  9 times out of 10 these are also the teams that have been working on their game for over a year and if they are lucky all they have to show is thousands of lines of code that power their engine, they won't have anything to show as far as the game goes.  So of course you should do some research to find where the demand is, from my experience (been doing this for over 15 years now) it's rarely to never in C++.  Simply put the big boys are the only ones that finish games AND need a C++ programmer.  The C++ programmer that they need must have been a member of previous game projects before they will even be considered.  You will end up behind a seemingly insurmountable brick wall when you stick to just C++ (although you will find yourself working your butt off time and time again for teams to fall apart due to long spans of working for little or no results).

 

My recommendation is always to learn basic C++ up to the point where you fully understand variables (and data types), functions, classes, methods and members.  Once you fully understand these core concepts move in to C# (because this will allow you to work in Unity and actually get jobs, create your own games and what not).  Once you get to the point where you feel comfortable scripting in C# look in to Javascript (which will let you make interactive website widgets and HTML5 games).  Yet another of the truly high demand fields that also empower you to get results fairly easily.

 

All in all if your goal is to make games you want to think like a designer first and a coder second.  What can you get / learn that will let you slap your game together and add logic?  The answer is not C++ no matter how popular that belief is, the answer is a premade game engine such as Unity, UDK, Torque and I'm sure many others.  When you start looking at these premade engines you find out it's free to use them as is meaning you "script" your logic in some other language like C#, Javascript, Boo, UnrealScript and so on.  When you want to use C++ with any of them you start looking at license fee's anywhere from $1,500.00 - $450,000.00 USD.

 

I'm not belittling C++ it is a very powerful cross platform language that is among the highest performance languages in existence.  I'm simply trying to point out that it is rarely ever actually used in the game itself.  It's used to make the underlying engine systems, and 9 times out of 10 even the big AAA companies don't even use 75% of hardware performance issues.  As such most successful indie and small development studios get to where they are by realizing they don't need to build an in house engine, they need to complete their game and the way to do that is speed up hundreds if not thousands of times using technology that has already been made available to you.  (Eg get an engine, script in the language it wants and you actually finish your game).

 

Long story short, yes learn C++ but learn the language and the art of programming don't focus so much on using it to access direct x and open gl yet, just learn to program.  Once you learn to program start expanding your knowledge and look in to using engines to make games.  If you think the performance is too slow go take a cold shower lol. As rude as it sounds if you need more power than something like Unity or UDK provide you are doing something wrong.  Unity is just as powerful (if not more so) than you are likely to write yourself (your haven't been doing it for a dozen or so years like they have.  They have both perfected the art way better than you are likely too within the next few years and they focus on bettering their engine so you can make a game).


#2Dan Mayor

Posted 31 January 2013 - 12:06 PM

Most (if not all) complex engines use a scripting language to handle all of their logic, interface and so on.  C++ Is the language of the engine (and incorrectly some people use it to code everything).  C#, Javascript and Boo are the language of Unity, Lua is the language of many others, Python is probably the next most common from what I've seen.  Point is as a C++ programmer you'r usefulness is not in making the game so much as it is in making the engine and tool kits.  Considering most small / indie teams that actually produce a project by using a premade engine (most commonly now a days is unity) it's highly unlikely you will be recruited or hired to do C++ for gaming teams.

 

Now I'm sure people will come back to this saying "Our game uses nothing but C++, but we already have a programmer".  9 times out of 10 these are also the teams that have been working on their game for over a year and if they are lucky all they have to show is thousands of lines of code that power their engine, they won't have anything to show as far as the game goes.  So of course you should do some research to find where the demand is, from my experience (been doing this for over 15 years now) it's rarely to never in C++.  Simply put the big boys are the only ones that finish games AND need a C++ programmer.  The C++ programmer that they need must have been a member of previous game projects before they will even be considered.  You will end behind a seemingly insurmountable brick wall when you stick to just C++ (although you will find yourself working your butt off time and time again for teams to fall apart due to long spans of working for little or no results).

 

My recommendation is always to learn basic C++ up to the point where you fully understand variables (and data types), functions, classes, methods and members.  Once you fully understand these core concepts move in to C# (because this will allow you to work in Unity and actually get jobs, create your own games and what not).  Once you get to the point where you feel comfortable scripting in C# look in to Javascript (which will let you make interactive website widgets and HTML5 games).  Yet another of the truly high demand fields that also empower you to get results fairly easily.

 

All in all if your goal is to make games you want to think like a designer first and a coder second.  What can you get / learn that will let you slap your game together and add logic?  The answer is not C++ no matter how popular that belief is, the answer is a premade game engine such as Unity, UDK, Torque and I'm sure many others.  When you start looking at these premade engines you find out it's free to use them as is meaning you "script" your logic in some other language like C#, Javascript, Boo, UnrealScript and so on.  When you want to use C++ with any of them you start looking at license fee's anywhere from $1,500.00 - $450,000.00 USD.

 

I'm not belittling C++ it is a very powerful cross platform language that is among the highest performance languages in existence.  I'm simply trying to point out that it is rarely ever actually used in the game itself.  It's used to make the underlying engine systems, and 9 times out of 10 even the big AAA companies don't even use 75% of hardware performance issues.  As such most successful indie and small development studios get to where they are by realizing they don't need to build an in house engine, they need to complete their game and the way to do that is speed up hundreds if not thousands of times using technology that has already been made available to you.  (Eg get an engine, script in the language it wants and you actually finish your game).

 

Long story short, yes learn C++ but learn the language and the art of programming don't focus so much on using it to access direct x and open gl yet, just learn to program.  Once you learn to program start expanding your knowledge and look in to using engines to make games.  If you think the performance is too slow go take a cold shower lol. As rude as it sounds if you need more power than something like Unity or UDK provide you are doing something wrong.  Unity is just as powerful (if not more so) than you are likely to write yourself (your haven't been doing it for a dozen or so years like they have.  They have both perfected the art way better than you are likely too within the next few years and they focus on bettering their engine so you can make a game).


#1Dan Mayor

Posted 31 January 2013 - 12:05 PM

Most (if not all) complex languages use a scripting language to handle all of their logic, interface and so on.  C++ Is the language of the engine (and incorrectly some people use it to code everything).  C#, Javascript and Boo are the language of Unity, Lua is the language of many others, Python is probably the next most common from what I've seen.  Point is as a C++ programmer you'r usefulness is not in making the game so much as it is in making the engine and tool kits.  Considering most small / indie teams that actually produce a project by using a premade engine (most commonly now a days is unity) it's highly unlikely you will be recruited or hired to do C++ for gaming teams.

 

Now I'm sure people will come back to this saying "Our game uses nothing but C++, but we already have a programmer".  9 times out of 10 these are also the teams that have been working on their game for over a year and if they are lucky all they have to show is thousands of lines of code that power their engine, they won't have anything to show as far as the game goes.  So of course you should do some research to find where the demand is, from my experience (been doing this for over 15 years now) it's rarely to never in C++.  Simply put the big boys are the only ones that finish games AND need a C++ programmer.  The C++ programmer that they need must have been a member of previous game projects before they will even be considered.  You will end behind a seemingly insurmountable brick wall when you stick to just C++ (although you will find yourself working your butt off time and time again for teams to fall apart due to long spans of working for little or no results).

 

My recommendation is always to learn basic C++ up to the point where you fully understand variables (and data types), functions, classes, methods and members.  Once you fully understand these core concepts move in to C# (because this will allow you to work in Unity and actually get jobs, create your own games and what not).  Once you get to the point where you feel comfortable scripting in C# look in to Javascript (which will let you make interactive website widgets and HTML5 games).  Yet another of the truly high demand fields that also empower you to get results fairly easily.

 

All in all if your goal is to make games you want to think like a designer first and a coder second.  What can you get / learn that will let you slap your game together and add logic?  The answer is not C++ no matter how popular that belief is, the answer is a premade game engine such as Unity, UDK, Torque and I'm sure many others.  When you start looking at these premade engines you find out it's free to use them as is meaning you "script" your logic in some other language like C#, Javascript, Boo, UnrealScript and so on.  When you want to use C++ with any of them you start looking at license fee's anywhere from $1,500.00 - $450,000.00 USD.

 

I'm not belittling C++ it is a very powerful cross platform language that is among the highest performance languages in existence.  I'm simply trying to point out that it is rarely ever actually used in the game itself.  It's used to make the underlying engine systems, and 9 times out of 10 even the big AAA companies don't even use 75% of hardware performance issues.  As such most successful indie and small development studios get to where they are by realizing they don't need to build an in house engine, they need to complete their game and the way to do that is speed up hundreds if not thousands of times using technology that has already been made available to you.  (Eg get an engine, script in the language it wants and you actually finish your game).

 

Long story short, yes learn C++ but learn the language and the art of programming don't focus so much on using it to access direct x and open gl yet, just learn to program.  Once you learn to program start expanding your knowledge and look in to using engines to make games.  If you think the performance is too slow go take a cold shower lol. As rude as it sounds if you need more power than something like Unity or UDK provide you are doing something wrong.  Unity is just as powerful (if not more so) than you are likely to write yourself (your haven't been doing it for a dozen or so years like they have.  They have both perfected the art way better than you are likely too within the next few years and they focus on bettering their engine so you can make a game).


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