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#Actual3Ddreamer

Posted 31 January 2013 - 04:13 PM

Game engines do very in complexity and what they cover. One thing that they all have in common is that they eliminate much or sometimes all of the lower level coding such as the shader coding done for you, for example. Some game engines come with default end-user interfaces and some do not but leave that to you. The purpose of a game engine, after all, is to free the game developer to focus mostly or all of the effort on what the developer does best: Creating games by the coding process, so make a game source code instead of adding a game engine source code to the difficulty.



The game engine is the software and applications layer between your game coding and the runtime environment (such as Common Language Runtime or Java Runtime Environment) and/or machine/assembly language. In the case of industry or corporation APIs such as OpenGL, DirectX, Java APIs and so forth, these APIs are also a layer between your game coding and the machine/assembly level, but leave much of the tool making and other application work up to you as far as games are concerned. Consider these APIs to be more general application programming and open ended than a game engine which is made for programming a game. By the way, game engines depending on design can be an interface between a language which you use in the game engine such as C++, C#, C, or Java and APIs like OpenGL or DirectX within a framework such as Java Framework, .NET Framework, or Mono (an implementation of .NET actually). Simply remember that a game engine is the development environment layered or sandwiched between your game coding and lower level coding which you probably will never handle directly. The game engine is really a set of interfaces (at the core of it) between your coding and assembly/machine coding, but can sometimes be used with another intermediate layer such as OpenGL.

#13Ddreamer

Posted 31 January 2013 - 04:10 PM

Game engines do very in complexity and what they cover. One thing that they all have in common is that they eliminate much or sometimes all of the lower level coding such as the shader coding done for you, for example. Some game engines come with default end-user interfaces and some do not but leave that to you. The purpose of a game engine, after all, is to free the game developer to focus mostly or all of the effort on what the developer does best: Creating games by the coding process, so make a game source code instead of adding a game engine source code to the difficulty.



The game engine is the software and applications layer between your game coding and the runtime environment (such as Common Language Runtime or Java Runtime Environment) and/or machine/assembly language. In the case of industry or corporation APIs such as OpenGL, DirectX, Java APIs and so forth, these APIs are also a layer between your game coding and the machine/assembly level, but leave much of the tool making and other application work up to you as far as games are concerned. Consider these APIs to be more general application programming and open ended than a game engine which is made for programming a game. By the way, game engines depending on design can be an interface between a language which you use in the game engine such as C++, C#, C, or Java and APIs like OpenGL or DirectX within a framework such as Java Framework, .NET Framework, or Mono (an implementation of .NET actually). Simply remember that a game engine is the development environment layered or sandwiched between your game coding and lower level coding which you probably will never handle directly. The game engine is really a set of interfaces (at the core of it) between your coding and assembly/machine coding, but can sometime be used with another intermediate layer such as OpenGL.

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