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#ActualServant of the Lord

Posted 02 February 2013 - 08:32 PM

I'm okay with companies using my information for marketing and whatever, provided they are clear and upfront about what they're doing with it and I've expressly permitted it.

 

I didn't get this email, but I've also set my privacy controls on Facebook to max and have disabled all apps and turned their app platform off. I've also disabled allowing me in social ads. I also never "like" anything on any site (I'll "like" friend's posts and pictures), and I use Disconnect on Chrome.

 

I've got mixed feelings of "it's someone's own fault if they don't take a few minutes to disable things and tune their privacy settings to what they want" and "Facebook (and pretty much everyone else) is being sneaky and sly, and I don't like it." People argue it's hard to turn up your privacy controls, but honestly, it's not that hard.

 

There's a difference between harvesting my actions for research (Netflix or Amazon for example, for better recommendations to their user base, or better ad sales, for example), harvesting my personal information to sell to third parties, and using my identity to sell products to other people publicly (which, as I mentioned earlier, hadn't happened to me).

 

And it's nice to say, "yeah, just opt-out of that". But if there is no way to opt-out until Facebook settled the lawsuit, then that doesn't really hold water.

 

However, my understanding of the nature of the Facebook's feature was skewed. I heard on a respectable news site (Well, alright, it was Yahoo!, so almost respectable tongue.png) that someone had their Facebook profile associated with a 55 gallon container of lubricant and was used to market it without their knowledge.

 

What really happened, I've now found out, is that the person themselves posted the 55 gallon container on their Facebook page, and Facebook just highlighted the post in other feeds and linked to the product on Amazon, which is much less extreme (Here's the guy's article on it). The way it was initially phrased on Yahoo! made it sound to me (from a lack of details) that Facebook just associated a random user with a potentially embarrassing product to market it in ads when the user had nothing to do with it - but that's not what actually happened.


#1Servant of the Lord

Posted 02 February 2013 - 08:32 PM

I'm okay with companies using my information for marketing and whatever, provided they are clear and upfront about what they're doing with it and I've expressly permitted it.

 

I didn't get this email, but I've also set my privacy controls on Facebook to max and have disabled all apps and turned their app platform off. I've also disabled allowing me in social ads. I also never "like" anything on any site (I'll "like" friend's posts and pictures), and I use Disconnect on Chrome.

 

I've got mixed feelings of "it's someone's own fault if they don't take a few minutes to disable things and tune their privacy settings to what they want" and "Facebook (and pretty much everyone else) is being sneaky and sly, and I don't like it." People argue it's hard to turn up your privacy controls, but honestly, it's not that hard.

 

There's a difference between harvesting my actions for research (Netflix or Amazon for example, for better recommendations to their user base, or better ad sales, for example), harvesting my personal information to sell to third parties, and using my identity to sell products to other people publicly (which, as I mentioned earlier, hadn't happened to me).

 

And it's nice to say, "yeah, just opt-out of that". But if there is no way to opt-out until Facebook settled the lawsuit, then that doesn't really hold water.

 

However, my understanding of the nature of the Facebook's feature was skewed. I heard on a respectable news site (Well, alright, it was Yahoo!, so almost respectable tongue.png) that someone had their Facebook profile associated with a 55 gallon container of lubricant and was used to market it without their knowledge.

 

What really happened, I've now found out, is that the person themselves posted the 55 gallon container on their Facebook page, and Facebook just highlighted the post in other feeds and linked to the product on Amazon, which is much less extreme (Here's the guy's article on it). The way it was initially phrased on Yahoo! made it sound to me (from a lack of details) that Facebook just associated a random user with a potentially embarrassing product to market it in ads when the user had nothing to do with it.


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