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#ActualC0lumbo

Posted 04 February 2013 - 12:54 PM

I have seen that sort of an approach before (in a CPU skinning context) and I'm not aware of any benefits of it over and above the more common bind pose approach. I think that Max or Maya (or maybe both) tend to make it easier to get the weighting data that way, so perhaps that why it made it's way into the file format, but I'm pretty sure that when it comes to runtime skinning, you're best off processing the skin data to get a single bind pose position per vertex.

Do you know if Doom3 actually used the "weight position" that way in its shaders? I would be a little surprised if it did, but if it did, then I presume there was some good reason that I'm not seeing.

I think if you're keen on supporting >4 vertices, then you probably ought to do bind pose skinning. In fact probably you ought to do bind pose skinning regardless, unless there's some big benefit to doing it the "weight position" way.

#2C0lumbo

Posted 04 February 2013 - 12:54 PM

I have seen that sort of an approach before (in a CPU skinning context) and I'm not aware of any benefits of it over and above the more common bind pose approach. I think that Max or Maya (or maybe both) tend to make it easier to get the weighting data that way, so perhaps that why it made it's way into the file format, but I'm pretty sure that when it comes to runtime skinning, you're best off processing the skin data to get a single bind pose position per vertex.

Do you know if Doom3 actually used the "weight position" that way in its shaders? I would be a little surprised if it did, but if it did, then I presume there was some good reason that I'm not seeing.

I think if you're keen on supporting >4 vertices, then you probably ought to do bind pose skinning. In fact probably you ought to do bind pose skinning regardless, unless there's some big benefit to doing it the "weight position" way.

#1C0lumbo

Posted 04 February 2013 - 12:46 PM

I have seen that sort of an approach before and I'm not aware of any benefits of it over and above the more common bind pose approach. I think that Max or Maya (or maybe both) tend to make it easier to get the weighting data that way, so perhaps that why it made it's way into the file format, but I'm pretty sure that when it comes to runtime skinning, you're best off processing the skin data to get a single bind pose position per vertex.

 

Do you know if Doom3 actually used the "weight position" that way in its shaders? I would be a little surprised if it did, but if it did, then I presume there was some good reason that I'm not seeing.

 

I think if you're keen on supporting >4 vertices, then you probably ought to do bind pose skinning. In fact probably you ought to do bind pose skinning regardless, unless there's some big benefit to doing it the "weight position" way.


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