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#ActualCapoeirista

Posted 05 February 2013 - 12:41 AM

Hey Kjansen92,

OK to answer your questions....

1. I've talked to quite a few people registered with gamedev.net who are programmers in the game development industry, this site is an excellent resource.

2. I love my job. Working for a big publish has it's downsides, but I learn new things every day and help to build fun games - what more could I ask for?

3. Learning C++ is a good way to start. If you want to do this for a living then get a degree. Make your own games - you can start as small as you like, but spend time developing your own.

4. Loving or hating a language isn't really that important. Although there are languages I definitely prefer to work in (C++), they are just tools. Pick the appropriate tool for the appropriate job :) Every game development studio I've worked for uses C++, so it's good to have under your belt. Lots of indie frameworks (MonoGame) and engines (Unity) use C# (or C# like scripting) so that's an important language as well.

I just saw this article post by JackBid in another thread, you should read through it :

http://www.gamasutra.com/blogs/TommyRefenes/20130107/184432/How_do_I_get_started_programming_games.php

Hope that helps!

#3Capoeirista

Posted 05 February 2013 - 12:41 AM

Hey Kjansen92,

OK to answer your questions....

1. I've talked to quite a few people registered with gamedev.net who are programmers in the game development industry, this site is an excellent resource.

2. I love my job. Working for a big publish has it's downsides, but I learn new things every day and help to build fun games - what more could I ask for?

3. Learning C++ is a good way to start. If you want to do this for a living then get a degree. Make your own games - you can start as small as you like, but spend time developing your own.

4. Loving or hating a language isn't really that important. Although there are languages I definitely prefer to work in (C++), they are just tools. Pick the appropriate tool for the appropriate job :) Every game development studio I've worked for uses C++, so it's good to have under your belt. Lots of indie frameworks (MonoGame) and engines (Unity) use C# (or C# like scripting) so that's an important language as well.

I just saw this article post by JackBid in another thread, you should read through it :

http://www.gamasutra.com/blogs/TommyRefenes/20130107/184432/How_do_I_get_started_programming_games.php

Hope that helps!

#2Capoeirista

Posted 05 February 2013 - 12:41 AM

Hey Kjansen92,

OK to answer your questions....

1. I've talked to quite a few people registered with gamedev.net who are programmers in the game development industry, this site is an excellent resource.

2. I love my job. Working for a big publish has it's downsides, but I learn new things every day and help to build fun games - what more could I ask for?

3. Learning C++ is a good way to start. If you want to do this for a living then get a degree. Make your own games - you can start as small as you like, but spend time developing your own.

4. Loving or hating a language isn't really that important. Although there are languages I definitely prefer to work in (C++), they are just tools. Pick the appropriate tool for the appropriate job :) Every game development studio I've worked for uses C++, so it's good to have under your belt. Lots of indie frameworks (MonoGame) and engines (Unity) use C# (or C# like scripting) so that's an important language as well.

I just saw this article post by JackBid in another thread, you should read through it :

http://www.gamasutra.com/blogs/TommyRefenes/20130107/184432/How_do_I_get_started_programming_games.php

Hope that helps!

#1Capoeirista

Posted 05 February 2013 - 12:37 AM

Hey Kjansen92,

 

OK to answer your questions....

 

1. I've talked to quite a few people registered with gamedev.net who are programmers in the game development industry, this site is an excellent resource. 

 

2. I love my job. Working for a big publish has it's downsides, but I learn new things every day and help to build fun games - what more could I ask for? 

 

3. Learning C++ is a good way to start. If you want to do this for a living then get a degree. Make your own games - you can start as small as you like, but spend time developing your own.

 

4. Loving or hating a language isn't really that important. Although there are languages I definitely prefer to work in (C++), they are just tools. Pick the appropriate tool for the appropriate job :) Every game development studio I've worked for uses C++, so it's good to have under your belt. Lots of indie frameworks (MonoGame) and engines (Unity) use C# (or C# like scripting) so that's an important language as well.

 

Hope that helps!


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