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#Actualcr88192

Posted 05 February 2013 - 05:09 PM

OS is usually much more of a concern IME than hardware.

Windows vs Linux makes a much bigger difference than ATI vs NVIDIA, or Intel vs AMD, or ...


if running on lower-end hardware is important though, it isn't too hard to find a 5-10 year old or so laptop using an Intel graphics chipset or similar and test on this.

if it works and the performance is usable on something like this, it is probably going to be usable on most things which are newer.


sometimes it does diverge enough that one might end up with "generational splits" in the renderer though, like as-is:
there are lingering parts of the renderer that basically target OpenGL 1.x, and some paths specific to this (faster, less features, but less pretty);
and, some branches which depend on newer features (such as shaders, FBOs, and HDR);
and, more recently, trying to support OpenGL ES 2, which in many ways is nearly mutually incompatible with OpenGL 1.x;
...

so, it may make sense to set a lower limit (such as "desktop PCs from the past decade" or "laptops from within the past 5 years" or "requires at least half-way decent graphics hardware" or similar).

#1cr88192

Posted 05 February 2013 - 05:08 PM

OS is usually much more of a concern IME than hardware.

Windows vs Linux makes a much bigger difference than ATI vs NVIDIA, or Intel vs AMD, or ...


if running on lower-end hardware is important though, it isn't too hard to find a 5-10 year old or so laptop using an Intel graphics chipset or similar and test on this.

if it works and the performance is usable on something like this, it is probably going to be usable on most things which are newer.


sometimes it does diverge enough that one might end up with "generational splits" in the renderer though, like as-is:
there are lingering parts of the renderer that basically target OpenGL 1.x, and some paths specific to this (faster, less features, but less pretty);
and, some branches which depend on newer features (such as shaders and HDR);
and, more recently, trying to support OpenGL ES 2, which in many ways is nearly mutually incompatible with OpenGL 1.x;
...

so, it may make sense to set a lower limit (such as "desktop PCs from the past decade" or "laptops from within the past 5 years" or "requires at least half-way decent graphics hardware" or similar).

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