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#Actualnsmadsen

Posted 07 February 2013 - 12:14 PM

What he doesn't talk about is how he decides he wants suspended chords, and how he chooses several in a row that work well together without even thinking about it.

 

This is where an understanding of music theory really comes in handy. It takes much of the guessing work out of how to work out a progression. And it doesn't have to be an extensive, 4 year kind of understanding either.

Listening to plenty of other tracks and studying what is where will help illustrate why certain chords fall in certain places. For me it all comes down to tension and release, which is how a piece of music conveys grow or direction. So, taking the suspended chord as a example, this can often happen right before a cadence because the suspension raises the tension which makes the cadence (release) that much more satisfying. Harmony is just one of many methods to create tension and release.

I really like what Jeff Coffin suggested when discussing critical listening: listen to a full song and zeroing in on only one track at a time. Toggle this with listening to the track as a whole and you'll start to see how everything is combined to make a good track.


#1nsmadsen

Posted 07 February 2013 - 12:13 PM

What he doesn't talk about is how he decides he wants suspended chords, and how he chooses several in a row that work well together without even thinking about it.

 

This is where an understanding of music theory really comes in handy. It takes much of the guessing work out of how to work out a progression. Also listening to plenty of other tracks and studying what is where will help illustrate why certain chords fall in certain places. For me it all comes down to tension and release, which is how a piece of music conveys grow or direction. So, taking the suspended chord as a example, this can often happen right before a cadence because the suspension raises the tension which makes the cadence (release) that much more satisfying. Harmony is just one of many methods to create tension and release.

I really like what Jeff Coffin suggested when discussing critical listening: listen to a full song and zeroing in on only one track at a time. Toggle this with listening to the track as a whole and you'll start to see how everything is combined to make a good track.


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