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#ActualBornToCode

Posted 07 February 2013 - 02:38 PM

If you include the standard header , C++ defines alot of integer types that are more specific:
int8_t = -127 to +127

 

Actually int8_t is =-128 to 127 

uint8_t = 0 to 255
 
int16_t = -32,768 to +32,767 (32 thousand negative or positive)
uint16_t = 0 to 65,536 (65 thousand)
 
int32_t = -2,147,483,648 to +2,147,483,647    (two billion negative or positive)
uint32_t = 0 to 4,294,967,295  (4 billion)

int64_t = -9,223,372,036,854,775,808 to +9,223,372,036,854,775,807 (nine Quintillion negative or positive)
uint64_t = 0 to 18,446,744,073,709,551,615 (18 Quintillion)


#2BornToCode

Posted 07 February 2013 - 02:36 PM

If you include the standard header , C++ defines alot of integer types that are more specific:
int8_t = -127 to +127

 

Actually int8_t is =-128 to 127 The same applies to all the other type where both positive and negative value can be stored


#1BornToCode

Posted 07 February 2013 - 02:35 PM

If you include the standard header , C++ defines alot of integer types that are more specific:
int8_t = -127 to +127

 

Actually int8_t is =-128 to 127


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