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#ActualKarsten_

Posted 09 February 2013 - 12:19 PM

If you prefer to use Linux/UNIX to develop your game (i.e because you use it as your day to day OS) then you might have some success with wine-g++ and DirectX.
You probably wont be able to use closed source engines with this solution though because I doubt they would be able to link with GCC objects.

Engines I have used that work pretty well on both platforms include include Ogre3D and Irrlicht

I have not had great experience with Unity's Linux support. It only really works on the very latest distributions. RedHat Enterprise 6 couldnt run it due to incompatible glibc versions. This isn't really Unity's fault but is a symptom of using a closed source engine. Linux doesn't really maintain backwards binary compatibility in the way Windows does. (Which is why NVIDIA and AMD's drivers tend to be problematic).

OpenGL works on every platform I have ever used so I always strongly recommend this, even some people tell you that it isn't quite as "good" as DirectX. As an indie developer, it probably wont even make a difference to you. Personally, I find it much easier to get started with.

#4Karsten_

Posted 09 February 2013 - 12:18 PM

If you prefer to use Linux/UNIX to develop your game (i.e because you use it as your day to day OS) then you might have some success with wine-g++ and DirectX.
You probably wont be able to use closed source engines with this solution though because I doubt they would be able to link with GCC objects.

Engines I have used that work pretty well on both platforms include include Ogre3D and Irrlicht

I have not had great experience with Unity's Linux support. It only really works on the very latest distributions. RedHat Enterprise 6 couldnt run it due to incompatible glibc versions. This isn't really Unity's fault but is a symptom of using a closed source engine. Linux doesn't really maintain backwards binary compatibility in the way Windows does. (Which is why NVIDIA and AMD's drivers tend to be problematic).

OpenGL works on every platform I have ever used so I always strongly recommend this, even if it isn't quite as "good" as DirectX. As an indie developer, it probably wont even make a difference to you.

#3Karsten_

Posted 09 February 2013 - 12:17 PM

If you prefer to use Linux/UNIX to develop your game (i.e because you use it as your day to day OS) then you might have some success with wine-g++ and DirectX.
You probably wont be able to use closed source engines with this solution though because I doubt they would be able to link with GCC objects.

Engines I have used that work pretty well on both platforms include include Ogre3D and Irrlicht

I have not had great experience with Unity's Linux support. It only really works on the very latest distributions. RedHat Enterprise 6 couldnt run it due to incompatible glibc versions. This isn't really Unity's fault but is a symptom of using a closed source engine. Linux doesn't really maintain backwards binary compatibility in the way Windows does. (Which is why NVIDIA and AMD's drivers tent to be problematic).

OpenGL works on every platform I have ever used so I always strongly recommend this, even if it isn't quite as "good" as DirectX. As an indie developer, it probably wont even make a difference to you.

#2Karsten_

Posted 09 February 2013 - 12:15 PM

If you prefer to use Linux/UNIX to develop your game (i.e because you use it as your day to day OS) then you might have some success with wine-g++ and DirectX.

You probably wont be able to use closed source engines because I doubt they would be able to link with GCC objects.

Engines I have used that work pretty well on both platforms include include Ogre3D and Irrlicht

I have not had great experience with Unity's Linux support. It only really works on the very latest distributions. RedHat Enterprise 6 couldnt run it due to incompatible glibc versions. This isn't really Unity's fault but is a symptom of using a closed source engine. Linux doesn't really maintain backwards binary compatibility in the way Windows does. (Which is why NVIDIA and AMD's drivers tent to be problematic).

#1Karsten_

Posted 09 February 2013 - 12:14 PM

If you prefer to use Linux/UNIX to develop your game (i.e because you use it as your day to day OS) then you might have some success with wine-g++ and DirectX.

You probably wont be able to use closed source engines because I doubt they would be able to link with GCC objects.

Engines that work on both include...

Ogre3D
Irrlicht

I have not had great experience with Unity's Linux support. It only really works on the very latest distributions. RedHat Enterprise 6 couldnt run it due to incompatible glibc versions. This isn't really Unity's fault but is a symptom of using a closed source engine. Linux doesn't really maintain backwards binary compatibility in the way Windows does. (Which is why NVIDIA and AMD's drivers tent to be problematic).

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