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#ActualOberon_Command

Posted 10 February 2013 - 11:41 AM

I like your points about playing multiplayer games, but that does play into one of my worries: The Ouya may just turn into a fancy emulation box. I'm not really interested in paying $99 for a console that I'm just going to play Nintendo 64 emulations on (especially considering there were only like 5 good N64 games--but I digress). I recognize that you're making the point that emulation is just part of the whole package, and there will of course be new, Ouya-specific multiplayer games to play as well, but that leads me again to worry about who will be developing them.

Actually, I wasn't trying to say much of anything about emulation, since it's not really relevant to the point I was making, so no, I'm not saying that emulation is "just part of the whole package". I was just using those games as examples of the kind of multiplayer games I believe work well on consoles.
 

To answer your question, I wouldn't put mobile platforms against the PC in this way. But that's only because iOS, Android and Windows Phone devices have an entirely new interface, and entirely different markets (at least in terms of expectations).

This is what I was really getting at. Console and PC ecosystems have different expectations, just like mobile and PC ecosystems do. Now that I think of it, we may be digressing away from "why should anyone make anything for Ouya" and getting more into "why should anyone make anything for consoles in general," so I won't harp further on this point.

On the other hand, of course, is the one thing they brought up on their Kickstarter: The Ouya is a single console with a single user interface. You don't have to be confused about how users will interact with your game. When developing for the PC, obviously you don't have that luxury. And development on the big 3 consoles is only possible for a fairly privileged few dev companies. In that regard, I see one huge benefit to Ouya development.

Exactly. I would say that (if I judge things right) the Ouya is really about trying to get the advantages that a console provides, without having to deal with as many (or any, ideally) of the usual non-technical barriers developers face when doing console development.

#1Oberon_Command

Posted 10 February 2013 - 11:40 AM

I like your points about playing multiplayer games, but that does play into one of my worries: The Ouya may just turn into a fancy emulation box. I'm not really interested in paying $99 for a console that I'm just going to play Nintendo 64 emulations on (especially considering there were only like 5 good N64 games--but I digress). I recognize that you're making the point that emulation is just part of the whole package, and there will of course be new, Ouya-specific multiplayer games to play as well, but that leads me again to worry about who will be developing them.

Actually, I wasn't trying to say much of anything about emulation, since it's not really relevant to the point I was making, so no, I'm not saying that emulation is "just part of the whole package". I was just using those games as examples of the kind of multiplayer game I believe works well on consoles.
 

To answer your question, I wouldn't put mobile platforms against the PC in this way. But that's only because iOS, Android and Windows Phone devices have an entirely new interface, and entirely different markets (at least in terms of expectations).

This is what I was really getting at. Console and PC ecosystems have different expectations, just like mobile and PC ecosystems do. Now that I think of it, we may be digressing away from "why should anyone make anything for Ouya" and getting more into "why should anyone make anything for consoles in general," so I won't harp further on this point.

On the other hand, of course, is the one thing they brought up on their Kickstarter: The Ouya is a single console with a single user interface. You don't have to be confused about how users will interact with your game. When developing for the PC, obviously you don't have that luxury. And development on the big 3 consoles is only possible for a fairly privileged few dev companies. In that regard, I see one huge benefit to Ouya development.

Exactly. I would say that (if I judge things right) the Ouya is really about trying to get the advantages that a console provides, without having to deal with as many (or any, ideally) of the usual non-technical barriers developers face when doing console development.

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