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#ActualAnri

Posted 11 February 2013 - 05:14 AM

I think any game designer runs into this problem on a regular basis! 

 

First, there is good advice given by the previous posters about "just go for it". Expecting too much of yourself is usually counter-productive so you do have to just see what you can currently do and go from there...

 

Second, if you want to learn 3D then I recommend starting with a ray-caster engine.  If you're using C++ then I'll assume you are a windows user and suggest you forget about all these game libraries and just use the WindowsAPI. So long as you can draw a single dot on the screen, get keyboard & mouse input, then you can do 3D programming. Its then a question of how good your maths and software development skills are! happy.png

 

Third, whatever you do - good luck - but just start off small. Make a simple game in 3D and see it through to the end. As already said - it doesn't need to be perfect, just a start and something to show to others.  You will get some who say its shit, but hey, we can't all be Elves from Rivendale, can we? happy.png

 

"Brother, I would spare you that pain..." Ramirez, Highlander

 

When I first started out, I spent about six months learning C and skimming over C++. After a quick command-line RPG game, I went straight into the bells and whistles of DirectX. There was something called WinAPI and GDI along the way, which I spent a few pages on, and went charging into API-madness like a bull in a china shop. To be honest, I really didn't have a clue what I was doing and it was painful, and whilst I managed to make a 2D blaster or two, I came away with the conclusion that I needed to go back and learn C++ PROPERLY, and even then, a few games later, I realised that skimming WinAPI and GDI was a mistake. So, don't be in a rush. Spend time learning your language first, then whatever you need next.  You don't need to do everything all in one go...


#2Anri

Posted 11 February 2013 - 05:01 AM

I think any game designer runs into this problem on a regular basis! 

 

First, there is good advice given by the previous posters about "just go for it". Expecting too much of yourself is usually counter-productive so you do have to just see what you can currently do and go from there...

 

Second, if you want to learn 3D then I recommend starting with a ray-caster engine.  If you're using C++ then I'll assume you are a windows user and suggest you forget about all these game libraries and just use the WindowsAPI. So long as you can draw a single dot on the screen, get keyboard & mouse input, then you can do 3D programming. Its then a question of how good your maths and software development skills are! happy.png

 

Third, whatever you do - good luck - but just start off small. Make a simple game in 3D and see it through to the end. As already said - it doesn't need to be perfect, just a start and something to show to others.  You will get some who say its shit, but hey, we can't all be Elves from Rivendale, can we? happy.png

 

As for trying to rush things...don't. Take time out to learn your language first, perhaps take an evening class to make sure you are on the right track.  So, learn your language first and THEN consider WindowsAPI.  LOL, I remember learning C in six months, then rushing into C++, then skimming over WinAPI & GDI and heading straight for DirectX...oh, dear, what an idiot I was... o_O


#1Anri

Posted 11 February 2013 - 04:50 AM

I think any game designer runs into this problem on a regular basis!

 

First, there is good advice given by the previous posters about "just go for it". Expecting too much of yourself is usually counter-productive so you do have to just see what you can come up with and go from there...

 

Second, if you want to learn 3D then I recommend starting with a ray-caster engine.  If you're using C++ then I'll assume you are a windows user and suggest you forget about all these game libraries and just use the WindowsAPI. So long as you can draw a single dot on the screen, get keyboard & mouse input, then you can do 3D programming. Its then a question of how good your maths and software development skills are! ^_^

 

Third, whatever you do - good luck - but just start off small. Make a simple game in 3D and see it through to the end. As already said - it doesn't need to be perfect, just a start and something to show to others.  You will get some who say its shit, but hey, we can't all be Elves from Rivendale, can we? ^_^


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