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#Actualluca-deltodesco

Posted 11 February 2013 - 12:57 PM

inverse_inertia = inertia.inverse();

 

Anyways, if it aids:

 

By choosing the correct coordinate system for the object (For basic objects, the obvious one), you can always diagonalise the inertia tensor, and so it, and its inverse can be stored in a vector instead of a matrix, and then the inverse is just the component wise inverse:

(Ix, Iy, Iz)^-1 = (1/Ix, 1/Iy, 1/Iz)


#3luca-deltodesco

Posted 11 February 2013 - 12:53 PM

By choosing the correct coordinate system for the object (For basic objects, the obvious one), you can always diagonalise the inertia tensor, and so it, and its inverse can be stored in a vector instead of a matrix, and then the inverse is just the component wise inverse:

(Ix, Iy, Iz)^-1 = (1/Ix, 1/Iy, 1/Iz)


#2luca-deltodesco

Posted 11 February 2013 - 12:52 PM

By choosing the correct coordinate system for the object, you can always diagonalise the inertia tensor, and so it, and its inverse can be stored in a vector instead of a matrix, and then the inverse is just the component wise inverse:

(Ix, Iy, Iz)^-1 = (1/Ix, 1/Iy, 1/Iz)


#1luca-deltodesco

Posted 11 February 2013 - 12:51 PM

By choosing the correct coordinate system for the object, you can always diagonalise the inertia tensor, and so it, and its inverse can be stored in a vector instead of a matrix.


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