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#ActualMratthew

Posted 13 February 2013 - 10:11 PM

This isn't a knock against your drawing, please read the whole post. I would suggest checking out some anatomy reference to decide on the 3D shapes (sphere, cylander, cube, etc) of certain details of your drawing to help decide how they would look from other angles. Keep in mind 2D illustrations are a depiction of a 3D world, if you look, everything can be simplified into simple shapes. Many painters draw a carrot shape (up side down cone) for people in the distance.

An exercise to help with deciding on the character's features in profile is to assign shapes to the difference parts. Take a tracing paper and use a light table (your window on a sunny day, etc) to trace over your character and loosely sketch 3D shapes to represent the major parts and the minor features of the character. These decisions will help to determine how the profile of the character should look. Use other drawingslike yours to help this process as well. Since other artists will have nailed down some appealing shapes already that you can take and alter or just use.

An artist's most powerful tool is reference.

#5Mratthew

Posted 13 February 2013 - 10:11 PM

This isn't a knock against your drawing, please read the whole post. I would suggest checking out some anatomy reference to decide on the 3D shapes (sphere, cylander, cube, etc) of certain details of your drawing to help decide how they would look from other angles. Keep in mind 2D illustrations are a depiction of a 3D world, if you look, everything can be simplified into simple shapes. Many painters draw a carrot shape (up side down cone) for people in the distance.

An exercise to help with deciding on the character's features in profile is to assign shapes to the difference parts. Take a tracing paper and use a light table (your window on a sunny day, etc) to trace over your character and loosely sketch 3D shapes to represent the major parts and the minor features of the character. These decisions will help to determine how the profile of the character should look. Use other drawingslike yours to help this process as well. Since other artists will have nailed down some appealing shapes already that you can take and alter or just use.

An artist's most powerful tool is reference.

#4Mratthew

Posted 13 February 2013 - 10:10 PM

This isn't a knock against your drawing, please read the whole post. I would suggest checking out some anatomy reference to decide on the 3D shapes (sphere, cylander, cube, etc) of certain details of your drawing to help decide how they would look from other angles. Keep in mind 2D illustrations are a depiction of a 3D world, if you look, everything can be simplified into simple shapes. Many painters draw a carrot shape (up side down cone) for people in the distance.

An exercise to help with deciding on the character's features in profile is to assign shapes to the difference parts. Take a tracing paper and use a light table (your window on a sunny day, etc) to trace over your character and loosely sketch 3D shapes to represent the major parts and the minor features of the character. These decisions will help to determine how the profile of the character should look. Use other drawingslike yours to help this process as well. Since other artists will have nailed down some appealing shapes already that you can take and alter or just use.

An artist's most powerful tool is reference.

#3Mratthew

Posted 13 February 2013 - 10:10 PM

This isn't a knock against your drawing, please read the whole post. I would suggest checking out some anatomy reference to decide on the 3D shapes (sphere, cylander, cube, etc) of certain details of your drawing to help decide how they would look from other angles. Keep in mind 2D illustrations are a depiction of a 3D world, if you look, everything can be simplified into simple shapes. Many painters draw a carrot shape (up side down cone) for people in the distance.

An exercise to help with deciding on the character's features in profile is to assign shapes to the difference parts. Take a tracing paper and use a light table (your window on a sunny day, etc) to trace over your character and loosely sketch 3D shapes to represent the major parts and the minor features of the character. These decisions will help to determine how the profile of the character should look. Use other drawingslike yours to help this process as well. Since other artists will have nailed down some appealing shapes already that you can take and alter or just use.

An artist's most powerful tool is reference.

#2Mratthew

Posted 13 February 2013 - 09:58 PM

This isn't a knock against your drawing, please read the whole post. I would suggest checking out some anatomy reference to decide on the 3D shapes (sphere, cylander, cube, etc) of certain details of your drawing to help decide how they would look from other angles. Keep in mind 2D illustrations are a depiction of a 3D world, if you look, everything can be simplified into simple shapes. Many painters draw a carrot shape (up side down cone) for the human form of people in the distance.

An exercise to help with deciding on the character's profile features is to assign shapes to the difference parts. Take a tracing paper and use a light table (your window on a sunny day, etc) to trace over your character and loosely sketch shapes to represent the major parts and the minor features of the character. These decisions will help to determine how the profile of the character should look. Use other drawingslike yours to help this process as well. Since other artists will have nailed down some appealing shapes already that you can take and alter or just use.

An artist's most powerful tool is reference.

#1Mratthew

Posted 13 February 2013 - 08:48 PM

This isn't a knock against your drawing, please read the whole post. I would suggest checking out some anatomy reference to decide on the 3D shapes (sphere, cylander, cube, etc)  of certain details of your drawing to help decide how they would look from other angles. Keep in mind 2D illustrations are a depiction of a 3D world, if you look, everything can be simplified into simple shapes. Many painters draw a carrot shape (up side down cone) for the human form of people in the distance.

 

An exercise to help with deciding on the character's profile features is to assign shapes to the difference parts. Take a tracing paper and use a light table (your window on a sunny day, etc) to trace over your character and loosely sketch shapes to represent the major parts and the minor features of the character. These decisions will help to determine how the profile of the character should look. Use other drawingslike yours to help this process as well. Since other artists will have nailed down some appealing shapes already that you can take and alter or just use.

 

An artist's most powerful too is reference.


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