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#ActualMilcho

Posted 15 February 2013 - 08:14 AM

I guess you're right.

Well, i don't know - i'm asking cause even the site you linked calls it a meteorite (and presumably the Guardian, which is somewhat reputable i guess, does its research). 

I'm not sure of the exact classifications, like for example, if the meteor breaks up and pieces fall to the ground - are those pieces meteorites or is the meteor now called meteorite?

 

Space is a very big and very empty place.

This doesn't necessarily apply to floating rocks and such, but space being very empty makes some types of detection easier. What I'm thinking of is that one site that talked about no stealth in space - but it was generally based on radiation differences - so an object that has a significant (a few dozen kelvin?) temperature difference from space (which is near 2 Kelvin or so) should be easily detectable... at least in theory.


#1Milcho

Posted 15 February 2013 - 08:10 AM

Well, no i'm asking cause even the site you linked calls it a meteorite (and presumably the Guardian, which is somewhat reputable i guess, does its research). 

I'm not sure of the exact classifications, like for example, if the meteor breaks up and pieces fall to the ground - are those pieces meteorites or is the meteor now called meteorite?


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