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#ActualDan Violet Sagmiller

Posted 19 February 2013 - 07:39 AM

all the creativity-boosting games are forcing people to be creative. True creativity comes from boredom and undisturbed freedom of mind.

 

I think you missed the point of this.  Instead of boredom and undisturbed freedom, he gave a very specific break down of a personal creativity session. Most of what he talked about had to do with the fact you need to be in an open mind to be effectively creative.  He gave structured approaches to it.  

 

However, if you wanted to get a bit more specific, he did bring up that it typically takes about 30 minutes to calm your brain down enough to relax and think more freely.  Given that as the case, most of these games wouldn't get you to that stage, unless they took longer than 30 minutes.

 

Another fascinating point he touched on around 22 minutes in, without getting to intense, is the reason for recess in school.  Recess was a play time.  It was a time where for most kids, you didn't have to worry about working and getting things right, and could just go out and experiment, play, have fun, relax.  Then, when the students get back into class they should hopefully have a more open mind again.  

 

at 23 minutes (earlier as well) he is discussing how you can't be afraid of mistakes.  Creativity is about trying things you wouldn't necessarily think are the correct choices at first.  And giving serious thought or time to figure it out.  (By serious, I mean more focused, as apposed to no joking around)

 

There are actually a lot of really interesting points he brings up to help creativity.  The point of the games is to help bring out topics along those lines.


#1Dan Violet Sagmiller

Posted 19 February 2013 - 07:36 AM

all the creativity-boosting games are forcing people to be creative. True creativity comes from boredom and undisturbed freedom of mind.

 

I think you missed the point of this.  Instead of boredom and undisturbed freedom, he gave a very specific break down of a personal creativity session. Most of what he talked about had to do with the fact you need to be in an open mind to be effectively creative.  He gave structured approaches to it.  

 

However, if you wanted to get a bit more specific, he did bring up that it typically takes about 30 minutes to calm your brain down enough to relax and think more freely.  Given that as the case, most of these games wouldn't get you to that stage, unless they took longer than 30 minutes.

 

Another fascinating point he touched on around 22 minutes in, without getting to intense, is the reason for recess in school.  Recess was a play time.  It was a time where for most kids, you didn't have to worry about working and getting things right, and could just go out and experiment, play, have fun, relax.  Then, when the students get back into class they should hopefully have a more open mind again.  

 

at 23 minutes (earlier as well) he is discussing how you can't be afraid of mistakes.  Creativity is about trying things you wouldn't necessarily think are the correct choices at first.  And giving serious thought or time to figure it out.  (By serious, I mean more focused, as apposed to no joking around)


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