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#Actual3Ddreamer

Posted 19 February 2013 - 09:15 AM

y biggest concern is graphics. I have absolutely no concept of graphics and am not exactly an artistic guy. What do you do for graphics?



Of C# and Java, which would be best? (I know, I know.. the generic no language is best answer). What's positive/not-so positive about each of these languages in game development terms?



I really am a complete beginner in terms of game development, but I am looking for a response that isn't geared to the programming new guy. I don't need to know how to learn Hello, World. I just need to put it all together!

 

Hi,

 

Java or C# makes probably no difference.  Both have been used alone or with other languages to make fantastic games, some popular sold titles.  Some make a convincing case that Java coding targeting the Java Runtime Environment or other cross-platform implementation is going to be a growing trend with more games made for PC, Mac, and mobile devices.  On the other hand, C# is simply a joy to use and quite powerful in its own right. Using Mono or SharpDX to get C# games cross-platform is realistic, such as how the Unity 3D was created on Mono, for example.  Really, pick your preference or flip a coin for it, makes no difference at this stage in my opinion. 

 

I highly recommend in your case that you choose a language and then a game engine which uses it.

 

List of Game Engines (Note: Only a partial list but important)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_game_engines

 

 

Game engines like Unity 3D (Open Source version) or Torque 3D (MIT license) have big communities which can support you, so look for an engine with that.  The big names have a lot of dedicated art assets which you can buy or get for free.  Some you can customize.  Besides that, there are thousands of people providing art assets online in every category.

 

I personally am a 2D/3D artist, IT Consultant in the industry, and hobby developer, so I kind of know what I am talking here. wink.png

 

1) Choose a language to start

2) Pick a game engine using that language which meets all your needs, including art assets available and community support

3) Make 3 to 5 simple 2D games using the game engine such as these:

 

Pong

Tetris

Asteroids

Pac Man

Defender

Mario Brothers

Galaxy

 

... or other simple 2D games.  Yes! You can use a 3D engine to make a 2D or 2.5D game!  For example, Torgue 2D release is focused on 2D and you can grow to 3D version of Torque 3D after a few months.  Make each game well and add your own features before moving to the next.  Respect copyrights, but you can make your own version for your private purposes. 

 

Making your own game engine would take years by itself to create a powerful one, so I recommend using an existing engine.  Some of them allow quite a lot of customizing of graphics once the time comes.

 

Once you begin to make unique games, then the open source or MIT license permit you to publish or even make money from your game, depending on license! biggrin.png  

 

After you get skills and something to show for it, you probably can find artists who want to join you.


#13Ddreamer

Posted 19 February 2013 - 09:10 AM

y biggest concern is graphics. I have absolutely no concept of graphics and am not exactly an artistic guy. What do you do for graphics?



Of C# and Java, which would be best? (I know, I know.. the generic no language is best answer). What's positive/not-so positive about each of these languages in game development terms?



I really am a complete beginner in terms of game development, but I am looking for a response that isn't geared to the programming new guy. I don't need to know how to learn Hello, World. I just need to put it all together!

 

Hi,

 

Java or C# makes probably no difference.  Both have been used alone or with other languages to make fantastic games, some popular sold titles.  Some make a convincing case that Java coding targeting the Java Runtime Environment or other cross-platform implementation is going to be a growing trend with more games made for PC, Mac, and mobile devices.  On the other hand, C# is simply a joy to use and quite powerful in its own right. Using Mono or SharpDX to get C# games cross-platform is realistic, such as how the Unity 3D was created on Mono, for example.  Really, pick your preference or flip a coin for it, makes no difference at this stage in my opinion. 

 

I highly recommend in your case that you choose a language and then a game engine which uses it.

 

List of Game Engines (Note: Only a partial list but important)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_game_engines

 

 

Game engines like Unity 3D (Open Source version) or Torque 3D (MIT license) have big communities which can support you, so look for a engine with that.  The big names have a lot of dedicated art assets which you can buy or get for free.  Some you can customize.  Besides that, there are thousands of people providing art assets online in every category.

 

I personally am a 2D/3D artist, IT Consultant in the industry, and hobby developer, so I kind of know what I am talking here. wink.png

 

1) Choose a language to start

2) Pick a game engine using that language which meets all your needs, including art assets available and community support

3) Make 3 to 5 simple 2D games using the game engine such as these:

 

Pong

Tetris

Asteroids

Pac Man

Defender

Mario Brothers

Galaxy

 

... or other simple 2D games.  Yes! You can use a 3D engine to make a 2D or 2.5D game!  For example, Torgue 2D release is focused on 2D and you can grow to 3D version of Torque 3D after a few months.  Make each game well and add your own features before moving to the next.  Respect copyrights, but you can make your own version for your private purposes. 

 

Making your own game engine would take years by itself to create a powerful one, so I recommend using an existing engine.  Some of them allow quite a lot of customizing of graphics once the time comes.

 

Once you begin to make unique games, then the open source or MIT license permit you to publish or even make money from your game, depending on license! biggrin.png  

 

After you get skills and something to show for it, you probably can find artists who want to join you.


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