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#ActualWoland

Posted 20 February 2013 - 03:07 AM

Yeah, Cleese is actually a brilliant business coach, apart from a hilarious guy smile.png

 

 

 

Woland, on 19 Feb 2013 - 10:18, said:
all the creativity-boosting games are forcing people to be creative. True creativity comes from boredom and undisturbed freedom of mind.

I think you missed the point of this. Instead of boredom and undisturbed freedom, he gave a very specific break down of a personal creativity session. Most of what he talked about had to do with the fact you need to be in an open mind to be effectively creative. He gave structured approaches to it.

However, if you wanted to get a bit more specific, he did bring up that it typically takes about 30 minutes to calm your brain down enough to relax and think more freely. Given that as the case, most of these games wouldn't get you to that stage, unless they took longer than 30 minutes.

 

In the second paragraph you yourself explained, that I didn't in fact miss the point. Games that aim at boosting creativity are supposed to be engaging. That's why they are called creativity-boosting games, not creativity-boosting recess. They never last over 30 minutes, as they seem to expect the results instantly.

 

I've done my share of creativity workshops and I admit, that they can produce the results, no doubts there. Still, you can't play creativity games with your team all the time and playing them by yourself doesn't get the job done. Therefore switching your mind off for a while is perfect exercise if you yourself want to wake your creativity up without some external incentive.

 

All in all, you may be right in one thing - I would definetely get more out of this video if I watched it again. Still, the fact is that 2 years after watching it, the thing I remember most is the technique to just get bored in an empty room where nothing distracts you. Maybe it's just a technique that works for me best. I would surely encourage people to experiment with it, but I'd never want them to stop experimenting with other techniques as well.

 

For example, the South Park team seems to be more creatively motivated by a ticking clock - they have a routine of making the episodes in a week just before the airing. The episodes are literally finished a few hours before. They mostly focus on brainstorming between people with sick ideas and it seems to work for them. On the other hand, fans are bitching about the downfall of quality, so maybe a little more extra time to polish the ideas would also do some good here? Still, if they feel comfortable with this kind of creative process and are content with the results then it's a technique just as good as any other.


#1Woland

Posted 20 February 2013 - 03:02 AM

Yeah, Cleese is actually a brilliant business coach, apart from a hilarious guy :)

 

 

Woland, on 19 Feb 2013 - 10:18, said:
all the creativity-boosting games are forcing people to be creative. True creativity comes from boredom and undisturbed freedom of mind.

I think you missed the point of this. Instead of boredom and undisturbed freedom, he gave a very specific break down of a personal creativity session. Most of what he talked about had to do with the fact you need to be in an open mind to be effectively creative. He gave structured approaches to it.

However, if you wanted to get a bit more specific, he did bring up that it typically takes about 30 minutes to calm your brain down enough to relax and think more freely. Given that as the case, most of these games wouldn't get you to that stage, unless they took longer than 30 minutes.

 

In the second paragraph you yourself explained, that I didn't in fact miss the point. Games that aim at boosting creativity are supposed to be engaging. That's why they are called creativity-boosting games, not creativity-boosting recess. They never last over 30 minutes, as they seem to expect the results instantly.

 

I've done my share of creativity workshops and I admit, that they can produce the results, no doubts there. Still, you can't play creativity games with your team all the time and playing them by yourself doesn't get the job done. Therefore switching your mind off for a while is perfect exercise if you yourself want to wake your creativity up without some external incentive.

 

All in all, you may be right in one thing - I would definetely get more out of this video if I watched it again. Still, the fact is that 2 years after watching it, the thing I remember most is the technique to just get bored in an empty room where nothing distracts you. Maybe it's just a technique that works for me best. I would surely encourage people to experiment with it, but I'd never want them to stop experimenting with other techniques as well.


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