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#Actualjwezorek

Posted 01 March 2013 - 07:10 PM

In that case, Cocos2d-x will likely meet your needs.

 
I've never heard of this before.  Is this a popular tool used among mobile game developers?

Cocos2d-x is a pretty common choice for mobile game development at this point mainly because if you want the following:

  1. Cross-platform
  2. C++
  3. Free

it currently is your only option.

 

If you don't want cross-platform, just want iOS, then you can use real cocos2d (formerly cocos2s-iphone) in Objective-C which is more mature. If you are willing to pay, you can use Marmalade which (I'm guessing) is a cleaner platform. If you don't care about C++ there are frameworks in which you write in a scripting language (lua, etc.), some of which are free (i think) but you won't have the kind of control you have in a native framework.

 

Otherwise, you can roll your own or you can use cocos2d-x.

 

I've been working with cocos2d-x for a few months now. My opinion of it is that it has a lot of warts but ultimately has solid bones. I haven't ran into any problems that I couldn't find a fix or at least a work-around for, no deal-breakers anyway, but it is also not the easiest large library/platform/framework type thing I have used. It is very much a work in progress; it's documentation is non-existent mostly. It's forums are active but the level of dialogue you get there is a mixed bag. Generally if you can't find sample code demonstrating how to do something you want to do, you have to read the cocos2d-iphone documentation and try to "port" the knowledge you gain back to cocos2d-x by reading its source code. I can imagine doing this sort of thing would be hard for beginners to programming, but it's not that big of a deal.

 

The main thing is understanding cocos2d-x's somewhat unintuitive memory manager and then you are all set.


#5jwezorek

Posted 01 March 2013 - 07:09 PM

In that case, Cocos2d-x will likely meet your needs.

 
I've never heard of this before.  Is this a popular tool used among mobile game developers?

Cocos2d-x is a pretty common choice at this point mainly because if you want the following:

  1. Cross-platform
  2. C++
  3. Free

it currently is your only option.

 

If you don't want cross-platform, just want iOS, then you can use real cocos2d (formerly cocos2s-iphone) in Objective-C which is more mature. If you are willing to pay, you can use Marmalade which (I'm guessing) is a cleaner platform. If you don't care about C++ there are frameworks in which you write in a scripting language (lua, etc.), some of which are free (i think) but you won't have the kind of control you have in a native framework.

 

Otherwise, you can roll your own or you can use cocos2d-x.

 

I've been working with cocos2d-x for a few months now. My opinion of it is that it has a lot of warts but ultimately has solid bones. I haven't ran into any problems that I couldn't find a fix or at least a work-around for, no deal-breakers anyway, but it is also not the easiest large library/platform/framework type thing I have used. It is very much a work in progress; it's documentation is non-existent mostly. It's forums are active but the level of dialogue you get there is a mixed bag. Generally if you can't find sample code demonstrating how to do something you want to do, you have to read the cocos2d-iphone documentation and try to "port" the knowledge you gain back to cocos2d-x by reading its source code. I can imagine doing this sort of thing would be hard for beginners to programming, but it's not that big of a deal.

 

The main thing is understanding cocos2d-x's somewhat unintuitive memory manager and then you are all set.


#4jwezorek

Posted 01 March 2013 - 07:09 PM

In that case, Cocos2d-x will likely meet your needs.

 
I've never heard of this before.  Is this a popular tool used among mobile game developers?

Cocos2d-x is a pretty common choice at this point mainly because if you want the following:

  1. Cross-platform
  2. C++
  3. Free

it currently is your only option.

 

If you don't want cross-platform, just want iOS, then you can use real cocos2d (formerly cocos2s-iphone) in Objective-C which is more mature. If you are willing to pay, you can use Marmalade which (I'm guessing) is a cleaner platform. If you don't care about C++ there are frameworks in which you write in a scripting language (lua, etc.), some of which are free (i think) but you won't have the kind of control you have in a native framework.

 

Otherwise, you can roll your own or you can use cocos2d-x.

 

I've been working with cocos2d-x for a few months now. My opinion of it is that it has a lot of warts but ultimately has solid bones. I haven't ran into any problems that I couldn't find a fix or at least a work-around for, no deal-breakers anyway, but it is also not the easiest large library/platform/framework type thing I have used. It is very much a work in progress; it's documentation is non-existent mostly. It's forums are active but the level of dialogue you get there is a mixed bag. Generally if you can't find sample code demonstrating how to do something you want to do, you have to read the cocos2d-iphone documentation and try to "port" the knowledge you gain back to cocos2d-x by reading its source code. I can imagine doing this sort of thing would be hard for beginners to programming, but it's not that big of a deal.

 

The main thing is understanding cocos2d-x somewhat unintuitive memory manager and then you are all set.


#3jwezorek

Posted 01 March 2013 - 07:07 PM

In that case, Cocos2d-x will likely meet your needs.

 
I've never heard of this before.  Is this a popular tool used among mobile game developers?

Cocos2d-x is a pretty common choice at this point mainly because if you want the following:

  1. Cross-platform
  2. C++
  3. Free

it currently is your only option.

 

If you don't want cross-platform, just want iOS, then you can use real cocos2d (formerly cocos2s-iphone) in Objective-C which is more mature. If you are willing to pay, you can use Marmalade which (I'm guessing) is a cleaner platform. If you don't care about C++ there are frameworks in which you write in a scripting language (lua, etc.), some of which are free (i think) but you won't have the kind of control you have in a native framework.

 

Otherwise, you can roll your own or you can use cocos2d-x.

 

I've been working with cocos2d-x for a few months now. My opinion of it is that it has a lot of warts but ultimately has solid bones. I haven't ran into any problems that I couldn't find a fix or at least a work-around for, no deal-breakers anyway, but it is also not the easiest large library/platform/framework type thing I have used. It is very much a work in progress; it's documentation is non-existent mostly. It's forums are active but the level of dialogue you get there is a mixed bag. Generally if you can't find sample code demonstrating how to do something you want to do, you have to read the cocos2d-iphone documentation and try to "port" the knowledge you gain back to cocos2d-x by reading its source code. I can imagine doing this sort of thing would be hard for beginners to programming, but it's not that big of deal.


#2jwezorek

Posted 01 March 2013 - 07:06 PM

In that case, Cocos2d-x will likely meet your needs.

 
I've never heard of this before.  Is this a popular tool used among mobile game developers?

Cocos2d-x is a pretty common choice at this point mainly because if you want the following:

  1. Cross-platform
  2. C++
  3. Free

it currently is your only option.

 

If you don't want cross-platform, just want iOS, then you can use real cocos2d (formerly cocos2s-iphone) in Objective-C which is more mature. If you are willing to pay, you can use Marmalade which (I'm guessing) is a cleaner platform. If you don't care about C++ there are frameworks in which you write in a scripting language (lua, etc.), some of which are free (i think) but you won't have the kind of control you have in a native framework.

 

Otherwise, you can roll your own or you can use cocos2d-x.

 

I've been working with cocos2d-x for a few months now. My opinion of it is that it has a lot of warts but ultimately has solid bones. I haven't ran into any problems that I couldn't find a fix or at least a work-around, no deal-breakers anyway, but it is also not the easiest large library/platform/framework type thing I have used. It is very much a work in progress; it's documentation is non-existent mostly. Generally if you can't find sample code demonstrating how to do something you want to do, you have to read the cocos2d-iphone documentation and try to "port" the knowledge you gain back to cocos2d-x by reading its source code. I can imagine doing this sort of thing would be hard for beginners to programming, but it's not that big of deal.


#1jwezorek

Posted 01 March 2013 - 07:05 PM

In that case, Cocos2d-x will likely meet your needs.

 
I've never heard of this before.  Is this a popular tool used among mobile game developers?

Cocos2d-x is a pretty common choice at this point mainly because if you want the following:

  1. Cross-platform
  2. C++
  3. Free

it currently is your only option.

 

If you don't want cross-platform, just want iOS, then you can use real cocos2d (formerly cocos2s-iphone) in Objective-C which is more mature. If you are willing to pay, you can use Marmalade which (I'm guessing) is a cleaner platform. If you don't care about C++, I believe, there are frameworks in which you write in a scripting language, some of which are free (i think) but you won't have the kind of control you have in a native framework.

 

Otherwise, you can roll your own or you can use cocos2d-x.

 

I've been working with cocos2d-x for a few months now. My opinion of it is that it has a lot of warts but ultimately has solid bones. I haven't ran into any problems that I couldn't find a fix or at least a work-around, no deal-breakers anyway, but it is also not the easiest large library/platform/framework type thing I have used. It is very much a work in progress; it's documentation is non-existent mostly. Generally if you can't find sample code demonstrating how to do something you want to do, you have to read the cocos2d-iphone documentation and try to "port" the knowledge you gain back to cocos2d-x by reading its source code. I can imagine doing this sort of thing would be hard for beginners to programming, but it's not that big of deal.


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