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#ActualPromit

Posted 01 March 2013 - 08:14 PM

Often, the unique ID lets you backtrace where something came from. You can tag it into commands being sent into the render or physics systems and use it to track misbehaving values inside that code. You can even display it on screen as a "what am I currently looking at?" marker, which is useful when you can SEE something going haywire but don't know where it came from or what it's linked to.

 

In terms of "needs", it depends. It's common to use unique IDs to manage message dispatching in message-based systems, for example. Or to separate physical pointers from the entity data, which can also be handy when reloading on the fly.


#2Promit

Posted 01 March 2013 - 08:13 PM

Often, the unique ID lets you backtrace where something came from. You can tag it into commands being sent into the render or physics systems and use it to track misbehaving values inside that code. You can even display it on screen as a "what am I currently looking at?" marker, which is useful when you can SEE something going haywire but don't know where it came from or what it's linked to.

 

In terms of "needs", it depends. It's common to use unique IDs to manage message dispatching in message-based systems, for example.


#1Promit

Posted 01 March 2013 - 08:12 PM

Often, the unique ID lets you backtrace where something came from. You can tag it into commands being sent into the render or physics systems and use it to track misbehaving values inside that code. You can even display it on screen as a "what am I currently looking at?" marker, which is useful when you can SEE something going haywire but don't know where it came from or what it's linked to.


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