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#Actualfutlib

Posted 04 March 2013 - 12:15 AM

I've been pondering which math/physics basics book to get for hours now.

  • My math basics are quite good from my BSc in CS. It's been a while though, and I would like a reference of things relevant to game development.
  • My physics basics are not very strong. I know some basic mechanics but that's about where it ends.
  • I'm mostly working on 2D games. I've worked on 3D games and would like to learn more about the graphics pipeline and rasterisation and such, but I can still get a specialised book on that.
  • I'm looking for information on collision detection and response algorithms.

There are several promising books, I've narrowed it down to just two:

 

Mathematics and Physics for Programmers

  • Very basic, starts at grade school level
  • More of a textbook than a reference, it seems
  • Covers all the relevant basic math topics: trigonometry, calculus, linear algebra
  • Seems to cover the relevant physics basics, but I can't tell for sure
  • Covers a broad range of topics, even some game theory and AI
  • Has a chapter on tile-based games, which is probably quite relevant to me
  • Uses lots of IMO rather difficult to read pseudo code
  • Uses slightly weird terminology, e.g. they're talking about "squares" instead of boxes when discussing collision detection, and of "collision resolution" instead of "collision response" (which gets much more relevant hits on Google at least)
  • Not well-known authors, doesn't get much praise

Essential Mathematics for Games and Interactive Applications

  • Seems appropriate for my level
  • Seems to use proper terminology
  • Does not cover trigonometry or calculus, doesn't even include a reference of the trigonometric identities
  • Covers linear algebra in much more depth
  • Covers rigid body physics
  • Has a highly interesting chapter on interpolation
  • Covers the graphics pipeline and shaders
  • Semi-popular authors, gets considerable praise
  • It's not on gamedev.net Books for some reason

I really am torn. Getting both seems wrong, as they cover much of the same ground.

 

MAPFP seems to be less known and less sophisticated, yet I could use a refresher on calculus and would like my reference to include trigonometry. It also has some interesting hands-on topics.

 

EMFGAIA seems more appropriate for my level, yet covers various things I don't really need right now, working on 2D games. But it seems to be more industry-connected, and at the same time more scientific/accurate.

 

So, what do you think, which one should I get? Or can you recommend another one appropriate for me?

 


#1futlib

Posted 04 March 2013 - 12:14 AM

I've been pondering which math/physics basics book to get for hours now.

  • My math basics are quite good from my BSc in CS. It's been a while though, and I would like a reference of things relevant to game development.
  • My physics basics are not very strong. I know some basic mechanics but that's about where it ends.
  • I'm mostly working on 2D games. I've worked on 3D games and would like to learn more about the graphics pipeline and rasterisation and such, but I can still get a specialised book on that.
  • I'm looking for information on collision detection and response algorithms.

There are several promising books, I've narrowed it down to just two:

 

Mathematics and Physics for Programmers

  • Very basic, starts at grade school level
  • More of a textbook than a reference, it seems
  • Covers all the relevant basic math topics: trigonometry, calculus, linear algebra
  • Seems to cover the relevant physics basics, but I can't tell for sure
  • Covers a broad range of topics, even some game theory and AI
  • Has a chapter on tile-based games, which is probably quite relevant to me
  • Uses lots of IMO rather difficult to read pseudo code
  • Uses slightly weird terminology, e.g. they're talking about "squares" instead of boxes when discussing collision detection, and of "collision resolution" instead of "collision response" (which gets much more relevant hits on Google at least)
  • Not well-known authors, doesn't get much praise

Essential Mathematics for Games and Interactive Applications

  • Seems appropriate for my level
  • Seems to use proper terminology
  • Does not cover trigonometry or calculus, doesn't even include a reference of the trigonometric identities
  • Covers linear algebra in much more depth
  • Covers rigid body physics
  • Has a highly interesting chapter on interpolation
  • Covers the graphics pipeline and shaders
  • Semi-popular authors, gets considerable praise
  • It's not on gamedev.net Books for some reason

I really am torn. Getting both seems wrong, as they cover much of the same ground.

 

MAPFP seems to be less known and less sophisticated, yet I could use a refresher on calculus and would like my reference to include trigonometry. It also has some interesting hands-on topics.

 

EMFGAIA seems more appropriate for my level, yet covers various things I don't really need right now, working on 2D games. But it seems to be more industry-connected, and at the same time more scientific/accurate.

 

So, what do you think, which one should I get? Or can you recommend another one appropriate for me?

 


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