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#ActualShiftyCake

Posted 04 March 2013 - 01:55 AM

As I am not a professional Game Designer, I feel I cannot give you feedback relevant to actual directions you should be heading for.
Yet I can give you some advice.

Design Games.
I know, its kind of an obvious one, yet its overlooked quite a lot. People graduate from game design courses, and think that's it, I'm done. Now all I have to do is get into the industry and start professional.
I disagree.
Game Design is, at its most basic form, the creation of a game through ones imagination and techniques. How does one improve such things? Buy designing games.

This is how I'd go.
First, organise different genre's of games with difficulty of implementation.
Once this is done, go with the easiest genre and think up an idea. Once you have that idea, design it.
By yourself, design this entire game and how it would be implemented. Include in everything you can possibly think of, and then some.
Now, you have a finished Game Design document right there, just waiting to be created.

Put it aside.

Don't continue to edit it, your not making a masterpeice, that won't help you design games. Now think up another idea of this genre, and repeat the process.
Keep doing this until you believe that you have the competency to design a game for that genre without respite.

Now move onto the next genre.

Are you seeing where I'm going with this? This is actually something I'm doing right now, since it'll help me exponentially in being able to design games. You can even put this in your resume, with link to each and every game design document (or the ones you feel are worthy).
in fact, this would help a lot when you get reviewed. You see, there a lot of people who wish to get into Game Designing professionally, but not many make it. There just aren't enough spots. So when they pick up your file, and look through it, they aren't looking for the credentials you have. Rather, they're looking for what sets you apart from everyone else.
Displaying this in your resume would show them that your committed to your work, that you can think for yourself, that you really do try to improve yourself. It shows that you look critically at yourself, or put in the effort to get someone else to look critically at you, and work from that.

This is only one example, though. You really need to start thinking critically.
What this helps you with is the creation and implementation of a design document of all genres, and also the expansion of idea's through imagination.
What else do you need in Game Design? Think of other methods to help you achieve this. The Game Designer that gets the career is the Game Designer that constantly aims to improve oneself.
---
Am I helping you here? I'm not good with explanations, so I'm never sure if I'm getting my points across to people.
Well, if you have any problems or questions, then post it here or send me a message.

EDIT: oh yeah. In my opinion, creative writing has a huge impact on game designing, whether its a story-aimed game or not. I'd recommend at some point you go back to uni and take some form of Masters in Creative Writing. It'll only go for 1 and a half years full time (or 3 part time), but I think you have to pay upfront. In the course I've been looking at, it is $9000 per Semester.
I feel it is worth it, but as I said this is my opinion. If you consider it, research it and find other people's thoughts on it.

#2ShiftyCake

Posted 04 March 2013 - 01:55 AM

As I am not a professional Game Designer, I feel I cannot give you feedback relevant to actual directions you should be heading for.
Yet I can give you some advice.

Design Games.
I know, its kind of an obvious one, yet its overlooked quite a lot. People graduate from game design courses, and think that's it, I'm done. Now all I have to do is get into the industry and start professional.
I disagree.
Game Design is, at its most basic form, the creation of a game through ones imagination and techniques. How does one improve such things? Buy designing games.

This is how I'd go.
First, organise different genre's of games with difficulty of implementation.
Once this is done, go with the easiest genre and think up an idea. Once you have that idea, design it.
By yourself, design this entire game and how it would be implemented. Include in everything you can possibly think of, and then some.
Now, you have a finished Game Design document right there, just waiting to be created.

Put it aside.

Don't continue to edit it, your not making a masterpeice, that won't help you design games. Now think up another idea of this genre, and repeat the process.
Keep doing this until you believe that you have the competency to design a game for that genre without respite.

Now move onto the next genre.

Are you seeing where I'm going with this? This is actually something I'm doing right now, since it'll help me exponentially in being able to design games. You can even put this in your resume, with link to each and every game design document (or the ones you feel are worthy).
in fact, this would help a lot when you get reviewed. You see, there a lot of people who wish to get into Game Designing professionally, but not many make it. There just aren't enough spots. So when they pick up your file, and look through it, they aren't looking for the credentials you have. Rather, they're looking for what sets you apart from everyone else.
Displaying this in your resume would show them that your committed to your work, that you can think for yourself, that you really do try to improve yourself. It shows that you look critically at yourself, or put in the effort to get someone else to look critically at you, and work from that.

This is only one example, though. You really need to start thinking critically.
What this helps you with is the creation and implementation of a design document of all genres, and also the expansion of idea's through imagination.
What else do you need in Game Design? Think of other methods to help you achieve this. The Game Designer that gets the career is the Game Designer that constantly aims to improve oneself.
---
Am I helping you here? I'm not good with explanations, so I'm never sure if I'm getting my points across to people.
Well, if you have any problems or questions, then post it here or send me a message.

EDIT: oh yeah. In my opinion, creative writing has a huge impact on game designing, whether its a story-aimed game or not. I'd recommend at some point you go back to uni and take some form of Masters in Creative Writing. It'll only go for 1 and a half years full time (or 3 part time), but I think you have to pay upfront. In the course I've been looking at, it is $9000 per Semester.
I feel it is worth it, but as I said this is my opinion. If you consider it, research it and find other people's thoughts on it.

#1ShiftyCake

Posted 04 March 2013 - 01:50 AM

As I am not a professional Game Designer, I feel I cannot give you feedback relevant to actual directions you should be heading for.

Yet I can give you some advice.

 

Design Games.

I know, its kind of an obvious one, yet its overlooked quite a lot. People graduate from game design courses, and think that's it, I'm done. Now all I have to do is get into the industry and start professional.

I disagree.

Game Design is, at its most basic form, the creation of a game through ones imagination and techniques. How does one improve such things? Buy designing games.

 

This is how I'd go.

First, organise different genre's of games with difficulty of implementation.

Once this is done, go with the easiest genre and think up an idea. Once you have that idea, design it.

By yourself, design this entire game and how it would be implemented. Include in everything you can possibly think of, and then some.

Now, you have a finished Game Design document right there, just waiting to be created.

 

Put it aside.

 

Don't continue to edit it, your not making a masterpeice, that won't help you design games. Now think up another idea of this genre, and repeat the process.

Keep doing this until you believe that you have the competency to design a game for that genre without respite.

 

Now move onto the next genre.

 

Are you seeing where I'm going with this? This is actually something I'm doing right now, since it'll help me exponentially in being able to design games. You can even put this in your resume, with link to each and every game design document (or the ones you feel are worthy).

in fact, this would help a lot when you get reviewed. You see, there a lot of people who wish to get into Game Designing professionally, but not many make it. There just aren't enough spots. So when they pick up your file, and look through it, they aren't looking for the credentials you have. Rather, they're looking for what sets you apart from everyone else.

Displaying this in your resume would show them that your committed to your work, that you can think for yourself, that you really do try to improve yourself. It shows that you look critically at yourself, or put in the effort to get someone else to look critically at you, and work from that.

 

This is only one example, though. You really need to start thinking critically.

What this helps you with is the creation and implementation of a design document of all genres, and also the expansion of idea's through imagination.

What else do you need in Game Deisgn? Think of other methods to help you achieve this. The Game Designer that gets the career is the Game Designer that constantly aims to improve oneself.

---

Am I helping you here? I'm not good with explanations, so I'm never sure if I'm getting my points across to people.

Well, if you have any problems or questions, then post it here or send me a message.


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