Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

We're offering banner ads on our site from just $5!

1. Details HERE. 2. GDNet+ Subscriptions HERE. 3. Ad upload HERE.


#ActualKhatharr

Posted 07 March 2013 - 12:43 AM

The same code can generally compile and run without problems on systems with diverse endianness (provided it's compiled for the appropriate targets). It's usually only something that you need to worry about when dealing with data between machines, and in that case you're better off using a compile-time macro that ensures that data is in the correct format or else is converted.

 

In order to encounter endianness problems in the code itself you'd have to get up to the same flavor of hackery that's going on in your test function there, which probably isn't good, and at least should be a rare occurrence.

 

Long story short, if it's not causing errors then don't mess with it.


#2Khatharr

Posted 07 March 2013 - 12:31 AM

The same code can generally compile and run without problems on systems with diverse endianness (provided it's compiled for the appropriate targets). It's usually only something that you need to worry about when dealing with data between machines, and in that case you're better off using a compile-time macro that ensures that data is in the correct format or else is converted.

 

Long story short, if it's not causing errors then don't mess with it.


#1Khatharr

Posted 07 March 2013 - 12:31 AM

The same code can generally compile and run without problems on systems with diverse endianness. It's usually only something that you need to worry about when dealing with data between machines, and in that case you're better off using a compile-time macro that ensures that data is in the correct format or else is converted.

 

Long story short, if it's not causing errors then don't mess with it.


PARTNERS