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#ActualGaldorPunk

Posted 07 March 2013 - 10:10 PM

Yeah, the kickstarter money it got is what really surprised me, but hey if people want to fund it that's completely fine. (although it does make me consider kickstarting my game…) There’s nothing really original or controversial in the video, like she says, the damsel in distress is very common because it appeals to the traditionally male demographic and requires very little writing to set up the character’s motivation. I'd like to see the second part, because most of the feminist writing I've seen is based on very old games like Mario or Legend of Zelda, and I don't think it's particularly useful to read too much into old games with very little in the way of story. Video games, especially when it comes to narratives have evolved a great deal from the early days, just like movies have. I'm not saying that there isn't a lot of sexism in video games, (because there is) but the damsel in distress thing is really just a case of lazy writing.

 

The damsel in distress isn’t even entirely exclusive to female characters, in fact there’s a very similar trope involving male characters, although the particulars are different. There are probably just as many if not more games where the hero's main motivation is based on a background male character being an "object" in the plot, although these stories usually involve the villain actually killing some background male character who is important to the hero. Just change princess/wife/girlfriend with father/brother/friend/mentor and the two tropes are pretty much identical in terms of how they play out. There is some gender distinction because the idea of rescuing is more often used with an apparently weaker woman or child, while it is more common for the hero to be driven to instead avenge the death of the older male mentor, but ultimately the two cases are very similar.


#1GaldorPunk

Posted 07 March 2013 - 10:09 PM

Yeah, the kickstarter money it got is what really surprised me, but hey if people want to fund it that's completely fine. (although it does make me consider kickstarting my game…) There’s nothing really original or controversial in the video, like she says, the damsel in distress is very common because it appeals to the traditionally male demographic and requires very little writing to set up the character’s motivation. I'd like to see the second part, because most of the feminist writing I've seen is based on very old games like Mario or Legend of Zelda, and I don't think it's particularly useful to read too much into old games with very little in the way of story. Video games, especially when it comes to narratives have evolved a great deal from the early days, just like movies have. I'm not saying that there isn't a lot of sexism in video games, (because there is) but the damsel in distress thing is really just a case of lazy writing.

 

The damsel in distress isn’t even entirely exclusive to female characters, in fact there’s a very similar trope involving male characters, although the particulars are different. There are probably just as many if not more games where the hero's main motivation is based on a background male character being an "object" in the plot, although these stories usually involve the villian actually killing some background male character who is important to the hero. Just change princess/wife/girlfriend with father/brother/friend/mentor and the two tropes are pretty much identical in terms of how they play out. There is some gender distinction because the idea of rescuing is more often used with an apparently weaker woman or child, while it is more common for the hero to be driven to instead avenge the death of the older male mentor, but ultimately the two cases are very similar.


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