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#Actualsamoth

Posted 08 March 2013 - 09:34 AM

If your game is entirely multiplayer, the DRM question does not arise. Multiplayer without network is hardly possible, and apart from peer-to-peer LAN games, how would one implement such a thing without a server?

Other than in the case of the games you mentioned, this is necessary.

The problem with the forementioned games was not that there were server problems, even though one should probably say "shame, shame on you" considering that these are not 1-man-shows but presumably multi-million dollar companies with at least a dozen (probably more) server administrators who are presumably experienced craftsmen that aren't setting up a server for the first time in their lives.

You would also normally expect that a multi-million company does a reasonable estimate of necessary resources based both on marketing research, pre-order sales, shop sales, and beta-launch metrics, and is able to afford more than a single $4.99/month server to handle the requests of a million customers.

The real problem is that they rendered the game entirely unplayable with their DRM solely because they can't get their shit straight, even though the game could be perfectly playable (for single player mode only, obviously). The server connection is strictly not necessary, except for enforcing restrictions on users.

Technical excuses for some missing functionality (online community, cloud store, whatever) aside, it is hard for a user who paid some real money to understand why he cannot use what he paid for at all when there is no obvious reason for that. Solely because some server doesn't work, which frankly, he couldn't care about less.

And then of course, there's the legitimate "what if they decide to turn off servers next year?" thought. It is very conceivable that the game publisher decides from one day to another that they don't want people to play D3 any more, but rather buy the new, expensive D4 (which is exactly identical, except for marginally better graphics, and you must pay for it again). So what do they do? They shut down the D3 servers, and the game stops working.

Bang. Now, the customer still paid real money for something that doesn't work at all, ever again.

#1samoth

Posted 08 March 2013 - 09:33 AM

If your game is entirely multiplayer, the DRM question does not arise. Multiplayer without network is hardly possible, and apart from peer-to-peer LAN games, how would one implement such a thing without a server?

Other than in the case of the games you mentioned, this is necessary.

The problem with these was not that there were server problems, even though one should probably say "shame, shame on you" considering that these are not 1-man-shows but presumably multi-million dollar companies with at least a dozen (probably more) server administrators who are presumably experienced craftsmen that aren't setting up a server for the first time in their lives.

You would also normally expect that a multi-million company does a reasonable estimate of necessary resources based both on marketing research, pre-order sales, shop sales, and beta-launch metrics, and is able to afford more than a single $4.99/month server to handle the requests of a million customers.

The real problem is that they rendered the game entirely unplayable with their DRM solely because they can't get their shit straight, even though the game could be perfectly playable (for single player mode only, obviously).

Technical excuses for some missing functionality (online community, cloud store, whatever) aside, it is hard for a user who paid some real money to understand why he cannot use what he paid for at all when there is no obvious reason for that. Solely because some server doesn't work, which frankly, he couldn't care about less.

And then of course, there's the legitimate "what if they decide to turn off servers next year?" thought. It is very conceivable that the game publisher decides from one day to another that they don't want people to play D3 any more, but rather buy the new, expensive D4 (which is exactly identical, except for marginally better graphics, and you must pay for it again). So what do they do? They shut down the D3 servers, and the game stops working.

Bang. Now, the customer still paid real money for something that doesn't work at all, ever again.

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