Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

#Actualfrench_hustler

Posted 16 March 2013 - 04:30 PM

Cowboy programming is very effective for me.  I find it extremely hard to "learn" and "progress" without some satisfaction from seeing results.  I need that gratification or else I think "what's the point of all this".  This is especially true if you program solo.  Without help, coding takes a looooooooong time.  Unfortunately, with spaghetti code, you will hit a fat brick wall from which you will have to refactor before being able to expand and add features to your project.  I think a better question would be at which point do I start refactoring and create a proper architecture.  There must be a balance of agility and planning in your development process.  Agility is great for learning.  It gives you great flexibility to go into things you'd rather learn about. 

 

Of course, studying proper software engineering WILL help you.  Learn about patterns, paradigms, and learn about different software architectures.  Knowledge is power, but you got to apply these things in your projects.  I love software development because you are the creator...  the application's building blocks is supported by your architecture, and seeing your application done as you invisioned it is the ultimate satisfaction.  And for large scale software, proper architecture and clean code is a must to the product's success.

 

At the end of the day, you manage your own time.  Hence, you must figure out when it is necessary to create clean structures to your code as opposed to hacking things up together.  Both have their own advantages....


#2french_hustler

Posted 16 March 2013 - 04:29 PM

Cowboy programming is very effective for me.  I find it extremely hard to "learn" and "progress" without some satisfaction from seeing results.  I need that gratification or else I think "what's the point of all this".  This is especially true if you program solo.  Without help, coding takes a looooooooong time.  Unfortunately, with spaghetti code, you will hit a fat brick wall from which you will have to refactor before being able to expand and add features to your project.  I think a better question would be at which point do I start refactoring and create a proper architecture.  There must be a balance of agility and planning in your development process.  Agility is great for learning.  It gives you great flexibility to go into things you'd rather learn about. 

 

Of course, studying proper software engineering WILL help you.  Learn about patterns, paradigms, and learn about different software architectures.  Knowledge is power, but you got to apply these things in your projects.  I love software development because you are the creator...  the application's building blocks is supported by your architecture, and seeing your application done as you invisioned it is the ultimate satisfaction. 

 

At the end of the day, you manage your own time.  Hence, you must figure out when it is necessary to create clean structures to your code as opposed to hacking things up together.  Both have their own advantages....


#1french_hustler

Posted 16 March 2013 - 04:28 PM

Cowboy programming is very effective for me.  I find it extremely hard to "learn" and "progress" without some satisfaction from seeing results.  I need that gratification or else I think "what's the point of all this".  This is especially true if you program solo.  Without help, coding takes a looooooooong time.  Unfortunately, with spaghetti code, you will hit a fat brick wall from which you will have to refactor before being able to expand and add features to your project.  I think a better question would be at which point do I start refactoring and create a proper architecture.  There must be a balance of ability and planning in your development process.  Agility is great for learning.  It gives you great flexibility to go into things you'd rather learn about. 

 

Of course, studying proper software engineering WILL help you.  Learn about patterns, paradigms, and learn about different software architectures.  Knowledge is power, but you got to apply these things in your projects.  I love software development because you are the creator...  the application's building blocks is supported by your architecture, and seeing your application done as you invisioned it is the ultimate satisfaction. 

 

At the end of the day, you manage your own time.  Hence, you must figure out when it is necessary to create clean structures to your code as opposed to hacking things up together.  Both have their own advantages....


PARTNERS