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#ActualiGoogleThis

Posted 21 March 2013 - 06:03 PM

You can write in that style in a higher level language if you like:

 

Are those prototypes up there above the main function or just globals?  Either way I can't wait to get good enough at it to throw a few for-fun versions of that down from off the top!

 

  1. Write first for correctness, properly weighing performance against maintainability, and choosing good algorithms.

 

Ravyne your entire post was super insightful!  That number 1 is definitely the key, figure if you can do that part right then optimazation should become less and less of an issue.  For me I'd rehash the thing till it's blazing fast and after awhile I suppose if you're good enough at that you can almost fit all of those steps into just number one there from the start.  My C code can be unruly at times because I like to avoid using too many pointers but that's a whole different topic.  Suppose to goes back to the performance thing being essential.

 

I'm a hardcore C programmer, and even program C in an OO style (function pointers in structs for polymorphism, etc), and some people give me trouble for it.  I understand C++ is there, but for my own personal projects (not at work: at work I use whatever the rest of the team is using because its not my project) I choose C.

 

 

DracoLacorente, Was that style something you eased into on your own?  I'm self-taught so it's a lot of give and take when it comes to style.  I actually started off learning Python somewhat formally but it was so whitespace-unfriendly.  The freedoms C gives you while staying kind of centered is why I like it.  That and of course the inline assembly capability that people frown upon.  I don't want to be that guy but it honestly just rings my bells.

 

I've seen it answered a few times but how does inline assembly fare as far as portabliity goes?  I don't do it at all yet but would that make it slightly more portable or the opposite? 


#2iGoogleThis

Posted 21 March 2013 - 06:01 PM

You can write in that style in a higher level language if you like:

 

Are those prototypes up there above the main function or just globals?  Either way I can't wait to get good enough at it to throw a few for-fun versions of that down from off the top!

 

  1. Write first for correctness, properly weighing performance against maintainability, and choosing good algorithms.

 

Ravyne your entire post was super insightful!  That number 1 is definitely the key, figure if you can do that part right then optimazation should become less and less of an issue.  For me I'd rehash the thing till it's blazing fast and after awhile I suppose if you're good enough at that you can almost fit all of those steps into just number one there from the start.  My C code can be unruly at times because I like to avoid using too many pointers but that's a whole different topic.  Suppose to goes back to the performance thing being essential.

 

I'm a hardcore C programmer, and even program C in an OO style (function pointers in structs for polymorphism, etc), and some people give me trouble for it.  I understand C++ is there, but for my own personal projects (not at work: at work I use whatever the rest of the team is using because its not my project) I choose C.

 

 

Was that style something you eased into on your own?  I'm self-taught so it's a lot of give and take when it comes to style.  I actually started off learning Python somewhat formally but it was so whitespace-unfriendly.  The freedoms C gives you while staying kind of centered is why I like it.  That and of course the inline assembly capability that people frown upon.  I don't want to be that guy but it honestly just rings my bells.


#1iGoogleThis

Posted 21 March 2013 - 06:01 PM

You can write in that style in a higher level language if you like:

 

Are those prototypes up there above the main function or just globals?  Either way I can't wait to get good enough at it to throw a few for-fun versions of that down from off the top!

 

  1. Write first for correctness, properly weighing performance against maintainability, and choosing good algorithms.

 

Ravyne your entire post was super insightful!  That number 1 is definitely the key, figure if you can do that part right then optimazation should become less and less of an issue.  For me I'd rehash the thing till it's blazing fast and after awhile I suppose if you're good enough at that you can almost fit all of those steps into just number one there from the start.  My C code can be unruly at times because I like to avoid using too many pointers but that's a whole different topic.  Suppose to goes back to the performance thing being essential.

 

I'm a hardcore C programmer, and even program C in an OO style (function pointers in structs for polymorphism, etc), and some people give me trouble for it.  I understand C++ is there, but for my own personal projects (not at work: at work I use whatever the rest of the team is using because its not my project) I choose C.

 

 

Was that style something you eased into on your own?  I'm self-taught so it's a lot of give and take when it comes to style.  I actually started off learning Python somewhat formally but it was so whitespace-unfriendly.  The freedoms C gives you while staying kind of centered is why I like it.  That and of course the inline assembly capability that people frown upon.  I don't want to be that guy but it honestly just rings my bells.


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