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#ActualHodgman

Posted 23 March 2013 - 06:52 AM

I've done this before, but with a GTX 260 and a GeForce 7 providing the 3rd output port.
I found that with a windowed mode app, it would run at full speed until I dragged it onto the 3rd screen. As soon as it was even partially on the 3rd screen, the performance would plummet. With a fullscreen app, the app can explicitly choose which GPU(s) it uses, but most don't give the user control over this decision, nor do they support processing on one and displaying on another -- most just use whichever GPU you open the window on (often the 'primary' monitor).

One workaround is to configure your screens not to be independent desktops, but to use the 'clone' mode, or the mode that makes them act as one giant-res screen.

Another workaround that I used for some games was to place a fake d3d9.dll in their directory, which created two GPU devices, processing on the fast one, then copying he final images across to he slow one manually... But I wouldn't try this with any games with anti-cheat mechanisms as it might be flagged as a potential aim-bot, etc!

Probably easier to plug your main monitor and TV into the fast card, and your 2ndary monitor into the second card.

#1Hodgman

Posted 23 March 2013 - 06:50 AM

I've done this before, but with a GTX 260 and a GeForce 7 providing the 3rd output port.
I found that with a windowed mode app, it would run at full speed until I dragged it onto the 3rd screen. As soon as it was even partially on the 3rd screen, the performance would plummet. With a fullscreen app, the app can explicitly choose which GPU(s) it uses, but most don't give the user control over this decision, nor do they support processing on one and displaying on another -- most just use whichever GPU you open the window on (often the 'primary' monitor).
One workaround is to configure your screens not to be independent desktops, but to use the 'clone' mode, or the mode that makes them act as one giant-res screen.
Another workaround that used for some games was to place a fake d3d9.dll in their directory, which created two GPU devices, processing on the fast one, then copying he final images across to he slow one manually...

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