Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account


#ActualEddieV223

Posted 24 March 2013 - 09:32 PM

Lol all this topic has gone way off course, if you're pointing to stack memory use a naked pointer, there isn't any reason to use a shared_ptr in this case.  If you wanted to you could use a reference, but there isn't much benefit in that except some cleaner syntax, but then you can't null the reference if you needed to.

 

If I were you either use a smart pointer to an std::array ( using the heap ), or just pass the address ( naked pointer to ) your std::array or c style array ( on the stack ).


#6EddieV223

Posted 24 March 2013 - 08:13 PM

Lol all this topic has gone way off course, if you're pointing to stack memory use a naked pointer, there isn't any reason to use a shared_ptr in this case.  If you wanted to you could use a reference, but there isn't much benefit in that except some cleaner syntax, but then you can't null the reference if you needed to.

 

If I were you either use a smart pointer to an std::array ( using the heap ), or just pass the address ( naked pointer to ) your std::array or c style array ( on the stack ).


#5EddieV223

Posted 24 March 2013 - 08:12 PM

Lol all this topic has gone way off course, if you're pointing to stack memory use a naked pointer, there isn't any reason to use a shared_ptr in this case.  If you wanted to you could use a reference, but there isn't much benefit in that except some cleaner syntax, but then you can't null the reference if you needed to.

 

If I were you either use a smart pointer to an std::array ( using the heap ), or just pass the address ( naked pointer to ) your std::array or c style array.


#4EddieV223

Posted 24 March 2013 - 08:10 PM

Lol all this topic has gone way off course, if you're pointing to stack memory use a naked pointer, there isn't any reason to use a shared_ptr in this case.  If you wanted to you could use a reference, but there isn't much benefit in that except some cleaner syntax, but then you can't null the reference if you needed to.


#3EddieV223

Posted 24 March 2013 - 08:09 PM

Lol all this topic has gone way off course, if you're pointing to stack memory use a naked pointer, there isn't any reason to use a shared_ptr in this case.  If you wanted to you could use a reference, but there isn't much benefit in that except some cleaner syntax, but then you can't null the reference if you needed to.


#2EddieV223

Posted 24 March 2013 - 08:08 PM

Lol all this topic has gone way off course, if you're pointing to stack memory use a naked pointer, there isn't any reason to use a shared_ptr in this case.


PARTNERS