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#ActualHodgman

Posted 26 March 2013 - 08:37 AM

defining the sizes of various numeric types (for example: "char" and "unsigned char" are 8 bits, "short" and "unsigned short" are 16-bits, ...);

C has addressed that with the sized types, like int_32t.


The "old style" / K&R style function declarations have been marked as obsolete since at least 1999, and many current compilers don't accept them any more.
 
As always though, the C99 spec mentions that they didn't forbid them outright for fear of breaking people's code. C++11 has a similar amount of hoop-jumping, because an updated standard that breaks old code is basically just a new language, not an update.

 

all this doesn't even need to be "the standard", but maybe could be a "standardized profile".

Yeah it would defeat the purpose of the whole C language to nail down all of those things, which are basically hardware details, as then the language couldn't be ported to other types of hardware. Having sub-standards /profiles for certain platforms, e.g. "C for x86" makes a bit more sense though wink.png


#1Hodgman

Posted 26 March 2013 - 08:36 AM

defining the sizes of various numeric types (for example: "char" and "unsigned char" are 8 bits, "short" and "unsigned short" are 16-bits, ...);

C has addressed that with the sized types, like int_32t.

 


The "old style" / K&R style function declarations have been marked as obsolete since at least 1999, and many current compilers don't accept them any more.
 
As always though, the C99 spec mentions that they didn't forbid them outright for fear of breaking people's code. C++11 has a similar amount of hoop-jumping, because an updated standard that breaks old code is basically just a new language, not an update.
 

all this doesn't even need to be "the standard", but maybe could be a "standardized profile".

Yeah it would defeat the purpose of the whole C language to nail down all of those things, which are basically hardware details, as then the language couldn't be ported to other types of hardware. Having sub-standards /profiles for certain platforms, e.g. "C for x86" makes a bit more sense though wink.png

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