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#ActualEliad Moshe

Posted 26 March 2013 - 03:51 PM

One more thing that you should consider when choosing your GUI platform is the license  of each GUI library and/or API .
 
Qt for example, has a dual license:
0. A paid-comercial license provided by digia for pure proprietary software.
1. A LGPL license that forces the folowing restrictions (for commercial applications):
You must->
0. Expose the interfaces for the free software components to end users.
1. Povide your app's object files.
2. Encapsulate the free software components inside a dynamic link library.
(If and only if you distribute your software to others)
 
GTK+ which is really brilliant, has a LGPL license as well.
 
WxWidgets has it's own license that lets you release your proprietary software without the need to expose anything as long as you disterbute your app in a binary form.
 
A word in regards to the win32 API:
 
The windows API gives you, by far, more power and flexibility than any other API listed (in the cost of implementing a huge set of things by yourself), 
for Windows operating systems.
It is true that it has a quite steep learning curve, although it is brilliantly documented, rich, fast and beautiful !
Also, it is required if you attempt to create a pure DirectX application. 
+ you can release your GUI components without any restrictions.

#5Eliad Moshe

Posted 26 March 2013 - 03:49 PM

One more thing that you should consider when choosing your GUI platform is the license  of each GUI library and/or API .
 
Qt for example, has a dual license:
0. A paid-comercial license provided by digia for pure proprietary software.
1. A LGPL license that forces the folowing restrictions (for commercial applications):
You must->
0. Expose the interfaces for the free software components to end users.
1. Povide your app's object files.
2. Encapsulate the free software components inside a dynamic link library.
(If and only if you distribute your software to others)
 
GTK+ which is really brilliant, has a LGPL license as well.
 
WxWidgets has it's own license that lets you release your proprietary software without the need to expose anything as long as you disterbute your app in a binary form.
 
A word in regards to the win32 API:
 
The windows API gives you, by far, more power and flexibility than any other API listed (in the cost of implementing a huge set of things by yourself), 
for Windows operating systems.
It is true that it has a quite steep learning curve, although it is brilliantly documented, rich, fast and beautiful !
Also, it is required if you attempt to create a pure DirectX application. 
+ you can release your GUI components without any restrictions.
 
MFC is quite legacy and has an ugly interface (in my opinion).

#4Eliad Moshe

Posted 26 March 2013 - 03:07 PM

One more thing that you should consider when choosing your GUI platform is the license  of each GUI library and/or API .
 
Qt for example, has a dual license:
0. A paid-comercial license provided by digia for pure proprietary software.
1. A LGPL license that forces the folowing restrictions:
You must->
0. Expose the  interfaces for the free software components to end users.
1. Povide your app's object files.
2. Encapsulate the free software components inside a dynamic link library.
(If and only if you distribute your software to others)
 
GTK+ which is really brilliant, has a LGPL license as well.
 
WxWidgets has it's own license that lets you release your proprietary software without the need to expose anything as long as you disterbute your app in a binary form.
 
A word in regards to the win32 API:
 
The windows API gives you, by far, more power and flexibility than any other API listed (in the cost of implementing a huge set of things by yourself), 
for Windows operating systems.
It is true that it has a quite steep learning curve, although it is brilliantly documented, rich, fast and beautiful !
Also, it is required if you attempt to create a pure DirectX application. 
+ you can release your GUI components without any restrictions.
 
MFC is quite legacy and has an ugly interface (in my opinion).

#3Eliad Moshe

Posted 26 March 2013 - 03:02 PM

One more thing that you should consider when choosing your GUI platform is the license  of each GUI library and/or API .
 
Qt for example, has a dual license:
0. A paid-comercial license provided by digia for pure proprietary software.
1. A LGPL license that forces the folowing restrictions:
You must->
0. Expose the  interfaces for the free software components to end users
1. Povide your app's object files.
2. Encapsulate the free software components inside a dynamic link library.
(If and only if you distribute your software to others)
 
GTK+ which is really brilliant, has a LGPL license as well.
 
WxWidgets has it's own license that lets you release your proprietary software without the need to expose anything as long as you disterbute your app in a binary form.
 
A word in regards to the win32 API:
 
The windows API gives you, by far, more power and flexibility than any other API listed (in the cost of implementing a huge set of things by yourself), 
for Windows operating systems.
It is true that it has a quite steep learning curve, although it is brilliantly documented, rich, fast and beautiful !
Also, it is required if you attempt to create a pure DirectX application. 
+ you can release your GUI components without any restrictions.
 
MFC is quite legacy and has an ugly interface (in my opinion).

#2Eliad Moshe

Posted 26 March 2013 - 02:58 PM

One more thing that you should consider when choosing your GUI platform is the license  of each GUI library and/or API .
 
Qt for example, has a dual license:
0. A paid-comercial license provided by digia for pure proprietary software.
1. A LGPL license that forces the folowing restrictions:
You must->
0. Expose the  interfaces for the free software components to end users
1. Povide your app's object files.
2. Encapsulate the free software components inside a dynamic link library.
 
GTK+ which is really brilliant, has a LGPL license as well.
 
WxWidgets has it's own license that lets you release your proprietary software without the need to expose anything as long as you disterbute your app in a binary form.
 
A word in regards to the win32 API:
 
The windows API gives you, by far, more power and flexibility than any other API listed (in the cost of implementing a huge set of things by yourself), 
for Windows operating systems.
It is true that it has a quite steep learning curve, although it is brilliantly documented, rich, fast and beautiful !
Also, it is required if you attempt to create a pure DirectX application. 
+ you can release your GUI components without any restrictions.
 
MFC is quite legacy and has an ugly interface (in my opinion).

#1Eliad Moshe

Posted 26 March 2013 - 02:57 PM

One more thing that you should consider when choosing your GUI platform is the license  of each GUI library and/or API .
 
Qt for example, has a dual license:
0. A paid-comercial license provided by digia for pure proprietary software.
1. A LGPL license that forces the folowing restrictions:
You must->
0. Expose the  interfaces for the free software components to end users
1. Povide your app's object files.
2. Encapsulate the free software components inside a dynamic link library.
 
GTK+ which is really brilliant, has a LGPL license as well.
 
WxWidgets has it's own license that lets you release your proprietary software without the need to expose anything as long as you disterbute your app in a binary form.
 
A word in regards to the win32 API:
 
The windows API gives you, by far, more power and flexibility than any other API listed (in the cost of implementing a huge set of things by yourself), 
for Windows operating systems.
It is true that it has a quite steep learning curve, although it is brilliantly documented, rich, fast and beautiful !
Also, it is required if you attempt to create a pure DirectX application. 
+ you can release your GUI components without any restrictions.
 
MFC is quite legacy and has an ugly interface (in my opinion).

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