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#ActualHodgman

Posted 27 March 2013 - 09:10 AM

Using traditional techniques, you would either want to recompile hundreds of different blur shaders for those different radii, as they'll all need different numbers of samples and different weights, or you'd have to use a loop in the shader to dynamically choose the number of weights.
 
Those traditional blur techniques are not very efficient at such large radii though.
A better technique would be to look into Summed Area Tables (SAT), e.g. http://www.nvidia.com/docs/IO/8227/GDC2003_SummedAreaTables.pdf
Or look in to using compute shaders to implement the typical gaussian blur.


#1Hodgman

Posted 27 March 2013 - 07:58 AM

Using traditional techniques, you would either want to recompile hundreds of different blur shaders for those different radii, as they'll all need different numbers of samples and different weights, or you'd have to use a loop in the shader to dynamically choose the number of weights.

 

Those traditional blur techniques are not very efficient at such large radii though.

A better technique would be to look into Summed Area Tables (SAT), e.g. http://www.nvidia.com/docs/IO/8227/GDC2003_SummedAreaTables.pdf


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