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#ActualBCullis

Posted 29 March 2013 - 08:23 AM

Having used both, I'd say C# and Visual Studio combine for a much better experience building GUIs than Java and Swing/AWT. I know there are dozens of add-on libraries for Java so everyone's mileage may vary depending on which package they know to grab, but I just found the C# route so much more direct: everything you need is ready to go in a great IDE and the partial class system means that when you dive in to edit button code and hook up your functionality, you don't have to sift through the crazy GUI-initialization verbosity.

To be fair to Java, it really does suffer from being the earlier of the two: like people have pointed out, C# got to watch Java make its mistakes first. And Java GUIs (if you package the jar correctly) will be cross-platform more easily* than C# tools.

*JVM is more common on most non-PC platforms than Mono. There are solutions for almost any platform, but the number of steps to get a Java application running is definitely fewer on average.

#1BCullis

Posted 29 March 2013 - 08:22 AM

Having used both, I'd say C# and Visual Studio combine for a much better experience building GUIs than Java and Swing/AWT. I know there are dozens of add-on libraries for Java so everyone's mileage may vary depending on which package they know to grab, but I just found the C# route so much more direct: everything you need is ready to go in a great IDE and the partial class system means that when you dive in to edit button code and hook up your functionality, you don't have to sift through the crazy GUI-initialization verbosity. To be fair to Java, it really does suffer from being the earlier of the two: like people have pointed out, C# got to watch Java make its mistakes first. And Java GUIs (if you package the jar correctly) will be cross-platform more easily* than C# tools. *JVM is more common on most non-PC platforms than Mono. There are solutions for almost any platform, but the number of steps to get a Java application running is definitely fewer on average.

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