Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

#ActualEarthBanana

Posted 29 March 2013 - 10:49 AM

First you need the games like tic tac toe to get your basic programming skills in the language of choice..

 

From their move on to 2d graphics I would say use some open source lib to make things a bit simpler - get used to the game pipeline - updating and drawing

Here you could make a simple top down arcade.. try to get smooth movements and nice looking animations.. Focus less on original gameplay and more on the production value of what you are doing.

 

After that I would say your ready to tackle using opengl or direct3D for graphics and whatever you want for sound - start getting in to the more technical

details - keepit very very simple.. but go 3d here if you are planning on getting in to it. Get a model to draw on the screen. Get some movement with input on the keyboard. Maybe don't even try for a game here - rather try to get very comfortable with using new technology - understanding shaders and matrix transforms. Work your way up to textured meshes , then meshes with full on materials (normal maps and specular maps and such). This is probably one of the most important steps if your planning on going 3d - which you probably should even if your making 2d games.

 

Once you get comortable with either openGL or Direct3d or I guess some other api of choice that is capable of 3d graphics - once you know how to use shaders and how to do transforms and how to efficiently structure your data for feeding to the graphics API of choice.. then its time to step it up to a real game focused production.

 

This is where the fun really starts (though the learning process is fun too) - this is where you might try and get a small team together to help out - people who are in the same boat as you. It would be great if you can get artists to help you out - make sure that if you work with someone at this point they know close to the same as you because if not it can create some stressful situations..

 

Or if your going alone then get designing. Always take steps of functionality before planning to far ahead - If your working alone I would suggest keeping the scope of the game reasonable - especially if you don't have someone for artwork. Maybe you could make some kind of simple fps with 4 levels and a boss. If you make it to this point - you'll know what you want to make.

 

Keep with it though!


#3EarthBanana

Posted 29 March 2013 - 10:48 AM

First you need the games like tic tac toe to get your basic programming skills in the language of choice..

 

From their move on to 2d graphics I would say use some open source lib to make things a bit simpler - get used to the game pipeline - updating and drawing

Here you could make a simple top down arcade.. try to get smooth movements and nice looking animations.. Focus less on original gameplay and more on the production value of what you are doing.

 

After that I would say your ready to tackle using opengl or direct3D for graphics and whatever you want for sound - start getting in to the more technical

details - keepit very very simple.. but go 3d here if you are planning on getting in to it. Get a model to draw on the screen. Get some movement with input on the keyboard. Maybe don't even try for a game here - rather try to get very comfortable with using new technology - understanding shaders and matrix transforms. Work your way up to textured meshes , then meshes with full on materials (normal maps and specular maps and such). This is probably one of the most important steps if your planning on going 3d - which you probably should even if your making 2d games.

 

Once you get comortable with either openGL or Direct3d or I guess some other api of choice that is capable of 3d graphics - once you know how to use shaders and how to do transforms and how to efficiently structure your data for feeding to the graphics API of choice.. then its time to step it up to a real game focused production.

 

This is where the fun really starts (though the learning process is fun too) - this is where you might try and get a small team together to help out - people who are in the same boat as you. It would be great if you can get artists to help you out - make sure that if you work with someone at this point they know close to the same as you because if not it can create some stressful situations..

 

Or if your going alone then get designing. Always take steps of functionality before planning to far ahead - If your working alone I would suggest keeping the scope of the game reasonable - especially if you don't have someone for artwork. Maybe you could make some kind of simple fps with 4 levels and a boss. If you make it to this point - you'll know what you want to make.

 

Keep with it though!

 

Of course thi


#2EarthBanana

Posted 29 March 2013 - 10:47 AM

First you need the games like tic tac toe to get your basic programming skills in the language of choice..

 

From their move on to 2d graphics I would say use some open source lib to make things a bit simpler - get used to the game pipeline - updating and drawing

Here you could make a simple top down arcade.. try to get smooth movements and nice looking animations.. Focus less on original gameplay and more on the production value of what you are doing.

 

After that I would say your ready to tackle using opengl or direct3D for graphics and whatever you want for sound - start getting in to the more technical

details - keepit very very simple.. but go 3d here if you are planning on getting in to it. Get a model to draw on the screen. Get some movement with input on the keyboard. Maybe don't even try for a game here - rather try to get very comfortable with using new technology - understanding shaders and matrix transforms. Work your way up to textured meshes , then meshes with full on materials (normal maps and specular maps and such). This is probably one of the most important steps if your planning on going 3d - which you probably should even if your making 2d games.

 

Once you get comortable with either openGL or Direct3d or I guess some other library of choice that is capable of 3d graphics - once you know how to use shaders and how to do transforms and how to efficiently structure your data for feeding to the graphics API of choice.. then its time to step it up to a real game focused production.

 

This is where the fun really starts (though the learning process is fun too) - this is where you might try and get a small team together to help out - people who are in the same boat as you. It would be great if you can get artists to help you out - make sure that if you work with someone at this point they know close to the same as you because if not it can create some stressful situations..

 

Or if your going alone then get designing. Always take steps of functionality before planning to far ahead - If your working alone I would suggest keeping the scope of the game reasonable - especially if you don't have someone for artwork. Maybe you could make some kind of simple fps with 4 levels and a boss. If you make it to this point - you'll know what you want to make.

 

Keep with it though!

 

Of course thi


#1EarthBanana

Posted 29 March 2013 - 10:46 AM

First you need the games like tic tac toe to get your basic programming skills in the language of choice..

 

From their move on to 2d graphics I would say use some open source lib to make things a bit simpler - get used to the game pipeline - updating and drawing

Here you could make a simple top down arcade.. try to get smooth movements and nice looking animations.. Focus less on original gameplay and more on the production value of what you are doing.

 

After that I would say your ready to tackle using opengl or direct3D for graphics and whatever you want for sound/networking - start getting in to the more technical

details - for this game I would suggest keeping it very very simple.. but go 3d here if you are planning on getting in to it. Get a model to draw on the screen. Get some movement with input on the keyboard. Maybe don't even try for a game here - rather try to get very comfortable with using new technology - understanding shaders and matrix transforms. Work your way up to textured meshes , then meshes with full on materials (normal maps and specular maps and such). This is probably one of the most important steps if your planning on going 3d - which you probably should even if your making 2d games.

 

Once you get comortable with either openGL or Direct3d or I guess some other library of choice that is capable of 3d graphics - once you know how to use shaders and how to do transforms and how to efficiently structure your data for feeding to the graphics API of choice.. then its time to step it up to a real game focused production.

 

This is where the fun really starts (though the learning process is fun too) - this is where you might try and get a small team together to help out - people who are in the same boat as you. It would be great if you can get artists to help you out - make sure that if you work with someone at this point they know close to the same as you because if not it can create some stressful situations..

 

Or if your going alone then get designing. Always take steps of functionality before planning to far ahead - If your working alone I would suggest keeping the scope of the game reasonable - especially if you don't have someone for artwork. Maybe you could make some kind of simple fps with 4 levels and a boss. If you make it to this point - you'll know what you want to make.

 

Keep with it though!

 

Of course thi


PARTNERS