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#ActualBummel

Posted 01 April 2013 - 11:15 PM

Ok, let's see if I finally got it right:

When I output a gradient which is the result of a mathematical linear interpolation between 0 and 1, then I'll perceive it to be linear since the sRGB cuve of the monitor (coincidentally) matches the human perception of lightness quite well.

As soon as I add gamma correction to this gradient I'll no longer perceive it to be linear, but instead it will be photometric linear, which leads to the effect that a value of 0.5 will be perceived as bright as a pattern made of alternating black and white stripes viewed from some distance, since (ideally) the monitor will emit the same amount of photons in the mean in both cases.


#1Bummel

Posted 01 April 2013 - 11:14 PM

Ok, let's see if I finally got it right:

When I output a gradient which is the result of a mathematically linear interpolation between 0 and 1, then I'll perceive it to be linear since the sRGB cuve of the monitor (coincidentally) matches the human perception of lightness quite well.

As soon as I add gamma correction to this gradient I'll no longer perceive it to be linear, but instead it will be photometric linear, which leads to the effect that a value of 0.5 will be perceived as bright as a pattern made of alternating black and white stripes viewed from some distance, since (ideally) the monitor will emit the same amount of photons in the mean in both cases.


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