Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

We're offering banner ads on our site from just $5!

1. Details HERE. 2. GDNet+ Subscriptions HERE. 3. Ad upload HERE.


#ActualKylotan

Posted 05 April 2013 - 10:49 AM

Only one person can get that job. So if more than 2 people applied, everybody's chance of failure was higher than their chance of success. No amount of positivity can change that - you just have to come to terms with the hard mathematical facts.

 

On the one hand, this is a positive thing. Everybody should expect to be turned down most of the time - but obviously someone gets the job. So it's not hopeless.

 

On the other hand, there are usually more people than there are interesting jobs for them. There is no guarantee you will ever get the job that you want, and the more uncommon the job, the higher this probability is. That's another thing you may have to come to terms with - adjusting your expectations if the kind of employment you want is not the kind of employment that is practical to get.

 

So I'm afraid I don't have any real words of encouragement. I would just suggest that you need to accept that you will be turned down most of the time, and carry on regardless, while tempering that with a sense of realism.

 

EDIT: I would also add that if you haven't gone into higher education yet and don't have any commercial experience then your idea of having enough experience for a role is likely to be well short of what an employer will look for. Luckily the first problem is fairly easy to solve, though time-consuming. The second problem will probably require you to take on some independent jobs, but that's par for the course for creative workers.

: stupid error in first sentence!


#2Kylotan

Posted 05 April 2013 - 10:47 AM

Only one person can get that job. So if more than 2 people applied, everybody's chance of failure was lower than their chance of success. No amount of positivity can change that - you just have to come to terms with the hard mathematical facts.

 

On the one hand, this is a positive thing. Everybody should expect to be turned down most of the time - but obviously someone gets the job. So it's not hopeless.

 

On the other hand, there are usually more people than there are interesting jobs for them. There is no guarantee you will ever get the job that you want, and the more uncommon the job, the higher this probability is. That's another thing you may have to come to terms with - adjusting your expectations if the kind of employment you want is not the kind of employment that is practical to get.

 

So I'm afraid I don't have any real words of encouragement. I would just suggest that you need to accept that you will be turned down most of the time, and carry on regardless, while tempering that with a sense of realism.

 

EDIT: I would also add that if you haven't gone into higher education yet and don't have any commercial experience then your idea of having enough experience for a role is likely to be well short of what an employer will look for. Luckily the first problem is fairly easy to solve, though time-consuming. The second problem will probably require you to take on some independent jobs, but that's par for the course for creative workers.


#1Kylotan

Posted 05 April 2013 - 10:42 AM

Only one person can get that job. So if more than 2 people applied, everybody's chance of failure was lower than their chance of success. No amount of positivity can change that - you just have to come to terms with the hard mathematical facts.

 

On the one hand, this is a positive thing. Everybody should expect to be turned down most of the time - but obviously someone gets the job. So it's not hopeless.

 

On the other hand, there are usually more people than there are interesting jobs for them. There is no guarantee you will ever get the job that you want, and the more uncommon the job, the higher this probability is. That's another thing you may have to come to terms with - adjusting your expectations if the kind of employment you want is not the kind of employment that is practical to get.

 

So I'm afraid I don't have any real words of encouragement. I would just suggest that you need to accept that you will be turned down most of the time, and carry on regardless, while tempering that with a sense of realism.


PARTNERS