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#Actualsunandshadow

Posted 06 April 2013 - 05:06 AM

I don't actually like classes.  By which I mean prescriptive classes, the usual kind.  Descriptive classes are cool but you rarely see those.  Much like with prescriptive and descriptive grammar, the first is the only one you ever hear about, while the second is actually interesting because it's more anthropology and less preaching rules.  Combat roles are related to both concepts.  When the game designer says "there are going to be combat roles A, B, and C, we'll carefully balance them and nerf any unexpected stuff that crops up," yeah that's boring.  But when you look at strategy and game theory in an anthropological way, as methods humans use to solve problems, you find that a combat role for a unit emerges naturally depending on how the player is attempting to use that particular unit.  There just aren't that many things to do in combat, and the whole point of the game is to challenge the player to find an approach that is efficient yet flexible, or a set of approaches for different puzzle-like situations.  Combat roles should be the player's tools that they play with in the game.


#1sunandshadow

Posted 06 April 2013 - 05:06 AM

I don't actually like classes.  By which I mean prescriptive classes, the usual kind.  Descriptive classes are cool but you rarely see those.  Much like with prescriptive and descriptive grammar, the first is the only one you ever hear about, while the second is actually interesting because it's more anthropology and less preaching rules.  Combat roles are related to both concepts.  When the game designer says "there are going to be combat roles A, B, and C, we'll carefully balance them and nerf any unexpected stuff that crops up,yeah that's boring.  But when you look at strategy and game theory in an anthropological way, as methods humans use to solve problems, you find that a combat role for a unit emerges naturally depending on how the player is attempting to use that particular unit.  There just aren't that many things to do in combat, and the whole point of the game is to challenge the player to find an approach that is efficient yet flexible, or a set of approaches for different puzzle-like situations.  Combat roles should be the player's tools that they play with in the game.


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