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#ActualCrowseye

Posted 06 April 2013 - 11:01 PM

I know some will probably consider it a waste of time, but writing games like Tetris and Snake on the console, and moving on to small Roguelikes can be a nice exercise for novice programmers IMO.  There's a useful lesson about separating game logic and graphics/input systems that writing such games for the console can help make clear.

 

Benryves has a tutorial that covers the basics of the console over on his site.  I started there and went on to write my own wrappers for console "graphics" and input.  If you follow kaktusas' link and dig around you can get to http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/ms683175(v=vs.85).aspx which gives you the documentation on the functions in wincon.h

 

If you google something like "Breakout console C++" or "Snake console C++" you can also find a number of examples with code (some better than others, obviously).


#1Crowseye

Posted 06 April 2013 - 10:56 PM

I know some will probably consider it a waste of time, but writing games like Tetris and Snake! on the console, and moving on to small Roguelikes can be a nice exercise for novice programmers IMO.  There's a useful lesson about separating game logic and graphics/input systems that writing such games for the console can help make clear.

 

Benryves has a tutorial that covers the basics of the console over on his site.  I started there and went on to write my own wrappers for console "graphics" and input.  If you follow kaktusas' link and dig around you can get to http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/ms683175(v=vs.85).aspx which gives you the documentation on the functions in wincon.h

 

If you google something like "Breakout console C++" or "Snake console C++" you can also find a number of examples with code (some better than others, obviously).


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