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#ActualHodgman

Posted 07 April 2013 - 06:47 AM

I'm just saying that if we could take the hatred, or ideological opposition, out of the equation, then there would not be two countries at this moment in time. East and West Germany became one big Germany once the ideological opposition was gone. Granted, this is not the exact same situation, but there are some similarities.

The Korean DMZ is quite analogeous to the Berlin wall. Getting rid of the DMZ (and all the weapons on either side, aimed at the other), would be a huge, huge step towards peace.
The other difference was that East Germans knew how bad they had it, and they wanted to escape. We're not sure how wide-spread internal dissent in NK is, nor how many of them know how much better their lives would be had the South won the Korean war (though that's just speculation, maybe Korea would be more like modern Vietnam than modern Japan, had the US not had a reason to prop it up so much -- or maybe if the north had won, whole-Korea would be technologically advanced and peaceful by now -- who knows). We basically need to somehow build communication lines into the country so that the citizenry can encounter foreign influences, without causing the North to either stop these efforts, or just build new gulags for the 'contaminated' minds...
East Germany was also propped up by the USSR, and their collapse was linked to the USSR's collapse. Unfortunately, NK doesn't draw their power from an external source (besides a small amount of trade/aid), so external politics can't really destroy it...
Lastly, the DMZ being mostly minefield instead of wall, presents a challenge to allowing David Hasselhoff to sing on top of it about freedom ;-)

#1Hodgman

Posted 07 April 2013 - 06:43 AM

I'm just saying that if we could take the hatred, or ideological opposition, out of the equation, then there would not be two countries at this moment in time. East and West Germany became one big Germany once the ideological opposition was gone. Granted, this is not the exact same situation, but there are some similarities.

The Korean DMZ is quite analogeous to the Berlin wall. Getting rid of the DMZ (and all the weapons on either side, aimed at the other), would be a huge, huge step towards peace.
The other difference was that East Germans knew how bad they had it, and they wanted to escape. We're not sure how wide-spread internal dissent in NK is, nor how many of them know how much better their lives would be had the Souh won the Korean war... We basically need to somehow build communication lines into the country so that the citizenry can encounter foreign influences, without causing the North to either stop these efforts, or just build new gulags for the 'contaminated' minds...
East Germany was also propped up by the USSR, and their collapse was linked to the USSR's collapse. Unfortunately, NK doesn't draw their power from an external source (besides a small amount of trade/aid), so external politics can't really destroy it...
Lastly, the DMZ being mostly minefield instead of wall, presents a challenge to allowing David Hasselhoff to sing on top of it about freedom ;-)

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