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#ActualRied

Posted 12 April 2013 - 03:10 PM

Yes it seems mostly like common sense, any techniques that you like to use when thinking up/jotting down a dialogue?

 

I've read about a practicing technique where you imagine the dialogue of three characters around a camp fire, the setting (and topic) is yours to decide, so let's say post-apocalyptic for the sake of being cliché. Then you decide accent the differences characters shall have, each one must have a different accent. Then the game is on pretty much. Has anyone tried this type of technique, or something similiar to it?

 

The thing I wonder the most about grammar is how to format it on paper.

 

Lord Fluffybottom's pants fell to the ground as he happily raised his glass and screamed "Hail to the queen!". The entire room of diplomats gasped and stared at his rainbow striped underwear with a pink unicorn on the left leg.

 

Lord Fluffybottom's pants fell to the ground as he happily raised his glass and screamed.

- "Hail to the queen!".

The entire room of diplomats gasped and stared at his rainbow striped underwear with a pink unicorn on the left leg.


#2Ried

Posted 12 April 2013 - 03:10 PM

Yes it seems mostly like common sense, any techniques you like to use when thinking up/jotting down a dialogue?

 

I've read about a practicing technique where you imagine the dialogue of three characters around a camp fire, the setting (and topic) is yours to decide, so let's say post-apocalyptic for the sake of being cliché. Then you decide accent the differences characters shall have, each one must have a different accent. Then the game is on pretty much. Has anyone tried this type of technique, or something similiar to it?

 

The thing I wonder the most about grammar is how to format it on paper.

 

Lord Fluffybottom's pants fell to the ground as he happily raised his glass and screamed "Hail to the queen!". The entire room of diplomats gasped and stared at his rainbow striped underwear with a pink unicorn on the left leg.

 

Lord Fluffybottom's pants fell to the ground as he happily raised his glass and screamed.

- "Hail to the queen!".

The entire room of diplomats gasped and stared at his rainbow striped underwear with a pink unicorn on the left leg.


#1Ried

Posted 12 April 2013 - 12:50 PM

Yes it seems mostly like common sense, any techniques you like to use when thinking up/jotting down a dialogue?

 

I've read about a practicing teachnique where you imagine the dialogue of three characters around a camp fire, the setting (and topic) is yours to decide, so let's say post-apocalyptic for the sake of being cliché. Then you decide accent the differences characters shall have, each one must have a different accent. Then the game is on pretty much. Has anyone tried this type of technique, or something similiar to it?

 

The thing I wonder the most about grammar is how to format it on paper.

 

Lord Fluffybottom's pants fell to the ground as he happily raised his glass and screamed "Hail to the queen!". The entire room of diplomats gasped and stared at his rainbow striped underwear with a pink unicorn on the left leg.

 

Lord Fluffybottom's pants fell to the ground as he happily raised his glass and screamed.

- "Hail to the queen!".

The entire room of diplomats gasped and stared at his rainbow striped underwear with a pink unicorn on the left leg.


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