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#Actualnsmadsen

Posted 17 April 2013 - 12:39 PM

Thanks for your time!  I would like to add that the music was indeed generic, however, it took three hours from the first note being composed to being a fully produced track, and was my first orchestral piece of music I'd ever made.  My composition background is mainly technical/progressive metal and dubstep.  I know it won't score me any points with anyone else, but I was fairly proud of that achievement tongue.png

 

For your first orchestral piece to compose, you did a good job! It was just too repetitive in my opinion. (And to stress, this is just my opinion so take what I say with a grain of salt.) The more you compose in a new style, the easier it becomes and the faster you get. 

 

This does beg one more question (sorry!):

 

Which genres are the most important to demonstrate composition and production skills, when it comes to seeking in-house sound design roles?  

 

 

Hmmm, well I think there's a disconnect. If you're looking for sound design roles then the audio director, manager or HR person will be looking at your sound design. The fact you can write music might come up later and be a benefit but they'll mostly be focused on what they're hiring for: a sound designer. Now if you're looking for an in-house position where you'll be doing both music and sound design then that makes more sense. 

 

There's no magical bullet or set genres that will get you work. It really depends on the client's needs at that moment. For example, if someone only writes orchestral music, then a futuristic, racing game which wants techno/metal fusion may not be interested. Also be careful thinking more complex means better music. By simply throwing in some variety, progression and development, the music you created would have had much more impact! 

 

I've chosen to steer clear of marketing myself as a composer, however, I would've wrote much more complex music if I thought it would help.

 

Thanks again!

 

Here's my advice: find several styles, genres which you are talented in and really enjoy creating. Focus on those styles and get your chops as good as you can. Fine tune your craft to where it sounds great! Then market yourself as that kind of composer. Worry less about which styles "get" jobs because in reality it's more quality that gets job. There are so many projects out there, each wanting something unique. I don't claim to be a hip hop or metal composer. I can fake it, to a degree but it's not my forte. But jazz, orchestral and quirky is right up my alley. 


#1nsmadsen

Posted 17 April 2013 - 12:37 PM

Thanks for your time!  I would like to add that the music was indeed generic, however, it took three hours from the first note being composed to being a fully produced track, and was my first orchestral piece of music I'd ever made.  My composition background is mainly technical/progressive metal and dubstep.  I know it won't score me any points with anyone else, but I was fairly proud of that achievement tongue.png  

 

For your first orchestral piece to compose, you did a good job! It was just too repetitive in my opinion. (And to stress, this is just my opinion so take what I say with a grain of salt.) The more you compose in a new style, the easier it becomes and the faster you get. 

 

This does beg one more question (sorry!):

 

Which genres are the most important to demonstrate composition and production skills, when it comes to seeking in-house sound design roles?  I've chosen to steer clear of marketing myself as a composer, however, I would've wrote much more complex music if I thought it would help.

 

Thanks again!

 

Hmmm, well I think there's a disconnect. If you're looking for sound design roles then the audio director, manager or HR person will be looking at your sound design. The fact you can write music might come up later and be a benefit but they'll mostly be focused on what they're hiring for: a sound designer. Now if you're looking for an in-house position where you'll be doing both music and sound design then that makes more sense. 

There's no magical bullet or set genres that will get you work. It really depends on the client's needs at that moment. For example, if someone only writes orchestral music, then a futuristic, racing game which wants techno/metal fusion may not be interested. 


Here's my advice: find several styles, genres which you are talented in and really enjoy creating. Focus on those styles and get your chops as good as you can. Fine tune your craft to where it sounds great! Then market yourself as that kind of composer. Worry less about which styles "get" jobs because in reality it's more quality that gets job. There are so many projects out there, each wanting something unique. I don't claim to be a hip hop or metal composer. I can fake it, to a degree but it's not my forte. But jazz, orchestral and quirky is right up my alley. 


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