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#Actualmudslinger

Posted 18 April 2013 - 08:23 AM

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if this is fine then Yao's approach seems doable since you probably don't have that many pieces.

...

your solution works if the initial state + the movement information received by each player is enough to derive the game's state at any turn. 

...

a player can't "change his mind" on his game state once the keys are revealed (by revealing a fake key which decrypts to what he wants - not likely to succeed in practice

...

 

I thought of these, it is a yes on all three points. It is the nature of the game that the strength of a piece is partially revealed after a challenge (e.g. opponent's piece won, it's stronger than mine). 


#2mudslinger

Posted 18 April 2013 - 08:19 AM

...

if this is fine then Yao's approach seems doable since you probably don't have that many pieces.

...

your solution works if the initial state + the movement information received by each player is enough to derive the game's state at any turn. 

...

a player can't "change his mind" on his game state once the keys are revealed (by revealing a fake key which decrypts to what he wants - not likely to succeed in practice

...

 

I thought of these, it is a yes on all three points. It is the nature of the game the strength of a piece is partially revealed after a challenge (e.g. opponent's piece won, it's stronger than mine). 


#1mudslinger

Posted 18 April 2013 - 08:14 AM

...

if this is fine then Yao's approach seems doable since you probably don't have that many pieces.

...

your solution works if the initial state + the movement information received by each player is enough to derive the game's state at any turn. 

...

a player can't "change his mind" on his game state once the keys are revealed (by revealing a fake key which decrypts to what he wants - not likely to succeed in practice

...

 

I thought of these, it is a yes on all three points.


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