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#ActualKryzon

Posted 20 April 2013 - 04:20 PM

Quick and easy way to do that: they're actually two different segments. Since they're of the same color and one slightly overlaps the other so you don't see its hard edge, they look like a single outline; The fact they're separate allows you to make that kind of structure (forking it). Doesn't matter which one is layered on top of which anyway.

 

I think you can even "merge" (or combine, or whatever the operation is) the two segments later on so they become a single vector object, but you should only do that when you're sure you won't change them anymore (save separate files with each state).


#1Kryzon

Posted 20 April 2013 - 04:19 PM

Quick and easy way to do that: they're actually two different segments. Since they're of the same color they look like a single outline, but the fact they're separate allows you to make that kind of structure (forking it). Doesn't matter which one is layered on top of which anyway.

 

I think you can even "merge" (or combine, or whatever the operation is) the two segments later on so they become a single vector object, but you should only do that when you're sure you won't change them anymore (save separate files with each state).


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