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#Actualfrob

Posted 24 April 2013 - 05:32 PM

I think this will be the overriding concern:

 

I'm working 3 shifts at work and I already managed my schedule so I can learn something from the above three.

Learning new skills takes time.  Hopefully you will have time on your current work that you can spend reading and developing skills.

 

 

 

What do you want to do?  Do you want to program games?  Or do you want to design games?

 

From the looks of the books, it seems like you want to program.  Programming is certainly a thing to make games.  

 

For most beginner programmers, it usually requires many hundred hours of practice and study before becoming competent enough to get into serious game programming.  After that, it requires several more hundreds (or thousands) of hours to build the game parts and put them together.  Many people do it, but just realize you are probably facing a multi-year investment of effort.

 

 

 

There are also non-programming game tools out there if you are more toward the designer personality.  You are limited to only doing the things they were written for, but they require much less time than learning how to program.  There are many out there, such as Game Maker Studio, that can do that job.

 

If your goal is just to make a game and not to be a professional programmer, that is more likely to be a successful route to making a game.


#1frob

Posted 24 April 2013 - 05:30 PM

I think this will be the overriding concern:

I'm working 3 shifts at work and I already managed my schedule so I can learn something from the above three.

Learning new skills takes time.  Hopefully you will have time on your current work that you can spend reading and developing skills.

 

 

 

What do you want to do?  Do you want to program games?  Or do you want to design games?

 

From the looks of the books, it seems like you want to program.  Programming is certainly a thing to make games.  

 

For most beginner programmers, it usually requires many hundred hours of practice and study before becoming competent enough to get into serious game programming.

 

 

 

There are also non-programming game tools out there if you are more toward the designer personality.  You are limited to only doing the things they were written for, but they require much less time than learning how to program.  There are many out there, such as Game Maker Studio, that can do that job.

 

If your goal is just to make a game and not to be a professional programmer, that is more likely to be a successful route to making a game.


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