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#ActualJLW

Posted 30 April 2013 - 03:44 AM

  • Bleeding cannot depend on damage type only; target type (e.g. a person vs. a robot with electric actuators) and wound location (e.g. flesh vs major blood vessels vs bones) are two equally important factors. Bleeding could also depend non-linearly on damage amount (in the case of people, small and superficial cuts stop bleeding much faster).

I already addressed this in the original post. Further, bleeding does reduce on its own within this system as a factor of fortitude, so wounds that inflict less bleed (such as those that do not meet the minimum penetration requirement to get bonuses for hitting a vital) will stop bleeding faster and with targets that have more fortitude this will happen faster. This is in addition to fortitude also shortening the hard bleed duration, of course.

EDIT: If it has a health score, it bleeds. If it doesn't bleed, that means it doesn't have a health score. Machines and such do not have health, instead only having part integrity. Disabling them is done by breaking parts of them, (engine kill, crew/computer/control kill, mobility kill, so on) and "destroying" them is done by damaging or destroying enough of them that none of them functions anymore. (Catastrophic kill.)

  • Likewise, pain makes serious assumptions about target type and hit location.

I didn't mention it, but the above also applies here. And also for fatigue, initial health damage, and basically everything else.

  • Do you really need formal damage types like Concussive, Bludgeon, Puncture, Incisive if you already have stats which are both more meaningful and more general? Some attacks could use the same standard formulas with different numbers, for example an almost "incisive/piercing" blade with vicious barbs could be rated 4x pain rather than 2x pain. Vague names are likely to have no use for players.

Yes, yes I do. The formal damage types are not only easily memorable categories that help the player figure out how a weapon works, they're also the basis of all resistances as the resistances themselves are separated by damage type. Not only this, but many feats, perks and even traits within the system use the damage types to categorize their effects.

Also, your specific example doesn't support your position. While a barbed blade would be more painful, it would only be so because it causes more damage than a regular blade. Its only defining feature are its "vicious" barbs that serve to hook into flesh and tear it as the blade passes through. This means it is dealing more damage, not causing more pain in proportion to damage.

#6JLW

Posted 30 April 2013 - 02:24 AM

  • Bleeding cannot depend on damage type only; target type (e.g. a person vs. a robot with electric actuators) and wound location (e.g. flesh vs major blood vessels vs bones) are two equally important factors. Bleeding could also depend non-linearly on damage amount (in the case of people, small and superficial cuts stop bleeding much faster).

 

I already addressed this in the original post. Further, bleeding does reduce on its own within this system as a factor of fortitude, so wounds that inflict less bleed (such as those that do not meet the minimum penetration requirement to get bonuses for hitting a vital) will stop bleeding faster and with targets that have more fortitude this will happen faster. This is in addition to fortitude also shortening the hard bleed duration, of course.

 

  • Likewise, pain makes serious assumptions about target type and hit location.

 

I didn't mention it, but the above also applies here. And also for fatigue, initial health damage, and basically everything else.

 

  • Do you really need formal damage types like Concussive, Bludgeon, Puncture, Incisive if you already have stats which are both more meaningful and more general? Some attacks could use the same standard formulas with different numbers, for example an almost "incisive/piercing" blade with vicious barbs could be rated 4x pain rather than 2x pain. Vague names are likely to have no use for players.

 

Yes, yes I do. The formal damage types are not only easily memorable categories that help the player figure out how a weapon works, they're also the basis of all resistances as the resistances themselves are separated by damage type. Not only this, but many feats, perks and even traits within the system use the damage types to categorize their effects.

 

Also, your specific example doesn't support your position. While a barbed blade would be more painful, it would only be so because it causes more damage than a regular blade. Its only defining feature are its "vicious" barbs that serve to hook into flesh and tear it as the blade passes through. This means it is dealing more damage, not causing more pain in proportion to damage.


#5JLW

Posted 30 April 2013 - 02:23 AM

  • Bleeding cannot depend on damage type only; target type (e.g. a person vs. a robot with electric actuators) and wound location (e.g. flesh vs major blood vessels vs bones) are two equally important factors. Bleeding could also depend non-linearly on damage amount (in the case of people, small and superficial cuts stop bleeding much faster).

 

I already addressed this in the original post. Further, bleeding does reduce on its own within this system as a factor of fortitude, so wounds that inflict less bleed (such as those that do not meet the minimum penetration requirement to get bonuses for hitting a vital) will stop bleeding faster and with targets that have more fortitude this will happen faster. This is in addition to fortitude also shortening the hard bleed duration, of course.

 

  • Likewise, pain makes serious assumptions about target type and hit location.

 

I didn't mention it, but the above also applies here. And also for fatigue, initial health damage, and basically everything else.

 

  • Do you really need formal damage types like Concussive, Bludgeon, Puncture, Incisive if you already have stats which are both more meaningful and more general? Some attacks could use the same standard formulas with different numbers, for example an almost "incisive/piercing" blade with vicious barbs could be rated 4x pain rather than 2x pain. Vague names are likely to have no use for players.

 

Yes, yes I do. The formal damage types are not only easily memorable categories that help the player figure out how a weapon works, they're also the basis of all resistances as the resistances themselves are separated by damage type. Not only this, but many feats, perks and even traits within the system use the damage types to categorize their effects. Lastly, your specific example doesn't support your position. While a barbed blade would be more painful, it would only be so because it causes more damage than a regular blade. Its only defining feature are its "vicious" barbs that serve to hook into flesh and tear it as the blade passes through. This means it is dealing more damage, not causing more pain in proportion to damage.


#4JLW

Posted 30 April 2013 - 02:22 AM

  • Bleeding cannot depend on damage type only; target type (e.g. a person vs. a robot with electric actuators) and wound location (e.g. flesh vs major blood vessels vs bones) are two equally important factors. Bleeding could also depend non-linearly on damage amount (in the case of people, small and superficial cuts stop bleeding much faster).

 

I already addressed this in the original post. Further, bleeding does reduce on its own within this system as a factor of fortitude, so wounds that inflict less bleed (such as those that do not meet the minimum penetration requirement to get bonuses for hitting a vital) will stop bleeding faster and with targets that have more fortitude this will happen faster. This is in addition to fortitude also shortening the hard bleed duration, of course.

 

  • Likewise, pain makes serious assumptions about target type and hit location.

I didn't mention it, but the above also applies here. And also for fatigue, initial health damage, and basically everything else.

  • Do you really need formal damage types like Concussive, Bludgeon, Puncture, Incisive if you already have stats which are both more meaningful and more general? Some attacks could use the same standard formulas with different numbers, for example an almost "incisive/piercing" blade with vicious barbs could be rated 4x pain rather than 2x pain. Vague names are likely to have no use for players.

Yes, yes I do. The formal damage types are not only easily memorable categories that help the player figure out how a weapon works, they're also the basis of all resistances as the resistances themselves are separated by damage type. Not only this, but many feats, perks and even traits within the system use the damage types to categorize their effects. Lastly, your specific example doesn't support your position. While a barbed blade would be more painful, it would only be so because it causes more damage than a regular blade. Its only defining feature are its "vicious" barbs that serve to hook into flesh and tear it as the blade passes through. This means it is dealing more damage, not causing more pain in proportion to damage.


#3JLW

Posted 30 April 2013 - 02:20 AM

  •  
  • Bleeding cannot depend on damage type only; target type (e.g. a person vs. a robot with electric actuators) and wound location (e.g. flesh vs major blood vessels vs bones) are two equally important factors. Bleeding could also depend non-linearly on damage amount (in the case of people, small and superficial cuts stop bleeding much faster).
  •  

 

I already addressed this in the original post.

 

"This value comes before multipliers for shot placement, and almost every part of the body has a multiplier."

 

Further, bleeding does reduce on its own within this system as a factor of fortitude, so wounds that inflict less bleed (such as those that do not meet the minimum penetration requirement to get bonuses for hitting a vital) will stop bleeding faster and with targets that have more fortitude this will happen faster. This is in addition to fortitude also shortening the hard bleed duration, of course.

 

  • Likewise, pain makes serious assumptions about target type and hit location.

I didn't mention it, but the above also applies here. And also for fatigue, initial health damage, and basically everything else.

  • Do you really need formal damage types like Concussive, Bludgeon, Puncture, Incisive if you already have stats which are both more meaningful and more general? Some attacks could use the same standard formulas with different numbers, for example an almost "incisive/piercing" blade with vicious barbs could be rated 4x pain rather than 2x pain. Vague names are likely to have no use for players.

Yes, yes I do. The formal damage types are not only easily memorable categories that help the player figure out how a weapon works, they're also the basis of all resistances as the resistances themselves are separated by damage type. Not only this, but many feats, perks and even traits within the system use the damage types to categorize their effects. Lastly, your specific example doesn't support your position. While a barbed blade would be more painful, it would only be so because it causes more damage than a regular blade. Its only defining feature are its "vicious" barbs that serve to hook into flesh and tear it as the blade passes through. This means it is dealing more damage, not causing more pain in proportion to damage.


#2JLW

Posted 30 April 2013 - 02:19 AM

  •  
  • Bleeding cannot depend on damage type only; target type (e.g. a person vs. a robot with electric actuators) and wound location (e.g. flesh vs major blood vessels vs bones) are two equally important factors. Bleeding could also depend non-linearly on damage amount (in the case of people, small and superficial cuts stop bleeding much faster).
  •  

Huh, funny. I could've sworn I already addressed that... Hm...

 

 

"This value comes before multipliers for shot placement, and almost every part of the body has a multiplier."

 

Ah, there it is. Knew it was somewhere.

 

Further, bleeding does reduce on its own within this system as a factor of fortitude, so wounds that inflict less bleed (such as those that do not meet the minimum penetration requirement to get bonuses for hitting a vital) will stop bleeding faster and with targets that have more fortitude this will happen faster. This is in addition to fortitude also shortening the hard bleed duration, of course.

 

  • Likewise, pain makes serious assumptions about target type and hit location.

I didn't mention it, but the above also applies here. And also for fatigue, initial health damage, and basically everything else.

  • Do you really need formal damage types like Concussive, Bludgeon, Puncture, Incisive if you already have stats which are both more meaningful and more general? Some attacks could use the same standard formulas with different numbers, for example an almost "incisive/piercing" blade with vicious barbs could be rated 4x pain rather than 2x pain. Vague names are likely to have no use for players.

Yes, yes I do. The formal damage types are not only easily memorable categories that help the player figure out how a weapon works, they're also the basis of all resistances as the resistances themselves are separated by damage type. Not only this, but many feats, perks and even traits within the system use the damage types to categorize their effects. Lastly, your specific example doesn't support your position. While a barbed blade would be more painful, it would only be so because it causes more damage than a regular blade. Its only defining feature are its "vicious" barbs that serve to hook into flesh and tear it as the blade passes through. This means it is dealing more damage, not causing more pain in proportion to damage.


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