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#Actualskytiger

Posted 06 May 2013 - 01:26 PM

I don't think you understand anything I have said

It is an isotropic surface - it radiates intensity equally in all directions

Lambertian surfaces do *not* radiate intensity equally in all directions - they radiate intensity proportional to cosine(viewing_angle)

Radiance depends on viewing angle

As the viewing angle increases the projected area of the emitter decreases and the radiance increases

When you COMBINE Lambertian reflectance's cosine term with radiance's 1/cosine term you get CONSTANT RADIANCE

You seem to believe that both radiance *and* intensity are constant!
 

your point that "radiance is independent of surface orientation" is simply completely wrong

radiance can ONLY be measured with respect to surface orientation!


#3skytiger

Posted 06 May 2013 - 12:24 PM

I don't think you understand anything I have said

It is an isotropic surface - it radiates intensity equally in all directions

Lambertian surfaces do *not* radiate intensity equally in all directions - they radiate intensity proportional to cosine(viewing_angle)

Radiance depends on viewing angle

As the viewing angle increases the projected area of the emitter decreases and the radiance increases

When you COMBINE Lambertian reflectance's cosine term with radiance's 1/cosine term you get CONSTANT RADIANCE

You seem to believe that both luminance *and* intensity are constant!
 

your point that "radiance is independent of surface orientation" is simply completely wrong

radiance can ONLY be measured with respect to surface orientation!


#2skytiger

Posted 06 May 2013 - 12:09 PM

I don't think you understand anything I have said

It is an isotropic surface - it radiates intensity equally in all directions

Lambertian surfaces do *not* radiate intensity equally in all directions - they radiate intensity proportional to cosine(viewing_angle)

Radiance depends on viewing angle

As the viewing angle increases the projected area of the emitter decreases and the radiance increases

When you COMBINE Lambertian reflectance's cosine term with radiance's 1/cosine term you get CONSTANT RADIANCE

You seem to believe that both luminance *and* intensity are constant!
 

our point that "radiance is independent of surface orientation" is simply completely wrong

radiance can ONLY be measured with respect to surface orientation!


#1skytiger

Posted 06 May 2013 - 12:06 PM

I don't think you understand anything I have said

It is an isotropic surface - it radiates intensity equally in all directions

Lambertian surfaces do *not* radiate intensity equally in all directions - they radiate intensity proportional to cosine(viewing_angle)

Radiance depends on viewing angle

As the viewing angle increases the projected area of the emitter decreases and the radiance increases

When you COMBINE Lambertian reflectance's cosine term with radiances' 1/cosine term you get CONSTANT RADIANCE

You seem to believe that both luminance *and* intensity are constant!
 

our point that "radiance is independent of surface orientation" is simply completely wrong

radiance can ONLY be measured with respect to surface orientation!


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