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#ActualJuliean

Posted 07 May 2013 - 05:36 AM

There's a reason that good programmers advocate the use of 'best practices', it's because worse practices cause actual, real life problems. KISS, and YAGNI matter of course, but "just slap it together" cannot be universally employed to produce quality software. Refactoring is important, but cannot be your only route to good design.



There needs to be a balance, and doing some simple things like not using singletons in your design will make the code significantly better and save you time - regardless of how many developers are on the project.

 

Second that! Up until before a couple of months, I've been used to writing code that just fulfilled on purpose - to work. The outcome was obvious: Most of the time the code didn't work, and it mosten ended at the point where it was too complicated even for myself to work with, even without a break of a few months. The only means of refactoring would have been to rewrite everything from scrath. Since I'm actually caring about "good design", and am not even afraid of a little over-engeneering, things are working out way way better for me. Its really better to simpliefy utterly sofisticated code if it turns out too complicated, than to improve horribly bad code because it turned out too unflexible and restricting to work with.


#1Juliean

Posted 07 May 2013 - 05:35 AM

There's a reason that good programmers advocate the use of 'best practices', it's because worse practices cause actual, real life problems. KISS, and YAGNI matter of course, but "just slap it together" cannot be universally employed to produce quality software. Refactoring is important, but cannot be your only route to good design.



There needs to be a balance, and doing some simple things like not using singletons in your design will make the code significantly better and save you time - regardless of how many developers are on the project.

 

Second that! Up until before a couple of months, I've been used to writing code that just fulfilled on purpose - to work. The outcome was obvious: Most of the time the code didn't work, and it mosten ended at the point where it was too complicated even for myself to work with, even without a break of a few months. The only means of refactoring would have been to rewrite everything from scrath. Since I'm actually caring about "good design", and am not even afraid of a little over-engeneering, things are working out way way better for me. Its really better to simpliefy utterly sofisticated code if it turns out too complicated than to improve horribly bad code because it turned out too unflexible and restricting to work with.


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